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In Dallas, EPA casts a net for answers on how pollution from concrete batch plants affects people’s health

EPA scientists went fishing to begin a study of how pollution from a group of concrete batch plants impacts human health.

DALLAS, TX - JANUARY 30, 2024: Jamie Morgan, 35, aquatic biologist at Jacobs Solutions, (left) sets up a gillnet with employees of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at Fish Trap Lake Park in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2024. The city of Dallas and local community leaders partnered with the EPA on the Cumulative Impacts Assessment Pilots Project, which focuses on the cumulative impacts from concrete batch plants. CREDIT: Desiree Rios for The Texas Tribune

DALLAS, TX - JANUARY 30, 2024: Janie Cisneros, 41, director of Singleton United/ UNIDOS, poses for a portrait at Fish Trap Lake Park in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2024. The city of Dallas and local community leaders partnered with the EPA on the Cumulative Impacts Assessment Pilots Project, which focuses on the cumulative impacts from concrete batch plants. CREDIT: Desiree Rios for The Texas Tribune
DALLAS, TX - JANUARY 30, 2024: From left to right, Employees of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Robert Cook, 54, environmental scientist, Nicholas Scott, 30, physical scientist, and Jamie Morgan, 35, aquatic biologist at Jacobs Solutions, prepare to set up gillnets at Fish Trap Lake Park in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2024. The city of Dallas and local community leaders partnered with the EPA on the Cumulative Impacts Assessment Pilots Project, which focuses on the cumulative impacts from concrete batch plants. CREDIT: Desiree Rios for The Texas Tribune

Fish will be tested for heavy metals

DALLAS, TX - JANUARY 30, 2024: Charles Langoria, 47, a West Dallas resident, volunteers to fish at Fish Trap Lake Park in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2024. The city of Dallas and local community leaders partnered with the EPA on the Cumulative Impacts Assessment Pilots Project, which focuses on the cumulative impacts from concrete batch plants. CREDIT: Desiree Rios for The Texas Tribune
Left: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency scientists, Robert Cook, left, and Chelsea Hidalgo, prepare to set up hook nets at Fish Trap Lake Park in Dallas. Right: Charles Langoria, 47, a West Dallas resident, holds up a bass fish caught at Fish Trap Lake Park.

Scientist hopes study informs policy

DALLAS, TX - JANUARY 30, 2024: From left to right, Jamie Morgan, 35, aquatic biologist at Jacobs Solutions, sets up a hoop net with environmental scientists of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Chelsea Hidalgo, 30, and Robert Cook, 54, at Fish Trap Lake Park in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2024. The city of Dallas and local community leaders partnered with the EPA on the Cumulative Impacts Assessment Pilots Project, which focuses on the cumulative impacts from concrete batch plants. CREDIT: Desiree Rios for The Texas Tribune
DALLAS, TX - JANUARY 30, 2024: Janie Cisneros, 41, director of Singleton United/ UNIDOS, (third from left) watches as employees of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) retrieve gillnets previously set out at Fish Trap Lake Park in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2024. The city of Dallas and local community leaders partnered with the EPA on the Cumulative Impacts Assessment Pilots Project, which focuses on the cumulative impacts from concrete batch plants. CREDIT: Desiree Rios for The Texas Tribune

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