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Canadian Record editor Laurie Ezzell Brown talks about the current state of small Texas newspapers. Her newspaper has ceased its print publication leaving only the online version to serve the community’s needs.

A storied Texas Panhandle newspaper halts publication after 130 years

The end of The Canadian Record’s print edition — even if temporary — is another indication of how perilous the news business is for local publishers and the communities they’re a part of.


The Citadel Executive Director Wendie Cook works at her desk in downtown Canadian.

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The Palace is one of the businesses in downtown Canadian. The town’s only printed newspaper has ceased its print publication leaving only an online version to serve the community’s needs.
View of one the businesses in downtown Canadian. The town’s only printed newspaper has ceased its print publication leaving only an online version to serve the community’s needs.
Canadian High School students practice on the school’s football field.

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The Hemphill County Courthouse is one of the buildings in downtown Canadian. The Canadian Record has ceased its print publication leaving only an online version to serve the community’s needs.
Bucket customers, from left, Frances Nix, her daughters Linda Trimmer and Glenda Nix eat lunch in the popular Canadian restaurant.

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Canadian City Manager Joe Jarosek talks about what the community means to him while eating lunch in the Bucket restaurant.
One of the businesses in downtown Canadian.

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From left, Canadian Record reporter Cathy Ricketts, editor Laurie Ezzell Brown and office manager Mary Smiithee stand in front of the newspaper’s offices. The newspaper ceased its print publication leaving only an online version to serve the community’s needs.
Mementos fill the Canadian Record shelves. The newspaper has ceased its print publication leaving only an online version to serve the community’s needs.
Brown looks over items in the photo darkroom, no longer in use.
Red and green flags sit unused in the corner of the office. The newspaper staff used to post a green flag outside the door to let the community know when the newspaper was printed and available, and the red flag when it was still in production. The newspaper ceased their print publication leaving only the online version to serve the community’s needs.

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