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“An inverse tsunami”: How inflation and drought are making it harder to feed West Texans in need

Food banks across Texas are now struggling to keep up with growing demand even more than they were during the pandemic.

Volunteer Gloria Benson uses cans to direct traffic into the food bank. West Texas Food Bank employees and volunteers load donated food into customer's cars during their weekly pick up outside of the food bank in Odessa, TX. Oct. 5, 2022.
West Texas Food Bank employees and volunteers load donated food into customer's cars during their weekly pick up outside of the food bank in Odessa, TX. Oct. 5, 2022.

“An inverse tsunami”

“It just keeps growing”

From left, Gloria Benson, Tricia Perkins, Gio Delgado and Stacey Casarez make plans before opening the line for pick up. West Texas Food Bank employees and volunteers load donated food into customer's cars during their weekly pick up outside of the food bank in Odessa, TX. Oct. 5, 2022.
Brent Oden passes out information to people in line. West Texas Food Bank employees and volunteers load donated food into customer's cars during their weekly pick up outside of the food bank in Odessa, TX. Oct. 5, 2022.
Yuchih Choy loads boxes of food into a pickup. West Texas Food Bank employees and volunteers load donated food into customer's cars during their weekly pick up outside of the food bank in Odessa, TX. Oct. 5, 2022.

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