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Victor Trevino administers a vaccine against COVID19 to Yaidra Lucas inside a bus on Thursday, March 3rd, 2022 in Laredo, TX. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune
Coronavirus in Texas

In Laredo, a bus brigade is vaccinating Mexican citizens with COVID-19 shots that Texans aren’t using

Launched in June, a cross-border effort using buses and donated vaccines is helping roughly 2,000 Nuevo Laredo residents per day get COVID-19 shots in Laredo — 10% of Texas’ daily total.

Carol Esteban waits for her COVID19 vaccine on Friday, March 4th, 2022 in Laredo, TX. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune
A nurses passes out patient's CDC vaccination cards on Friday, March 4th, 2022 in Laredo, TX. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune
Vaccines sit in a bag on Friday, March 4th, 2022 in Laredo, TX. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune
A bus driver drives towards the international bridge on Thursday, March 3rd, 2022 in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune
Busses carrying workers who will be vaccinated cross the border on Friday, March 4th, 2022 in Laredo, TX. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune

Shots arrive by car, plane and 18-wheeler

Workers enter records on computers at an office space on Thursday, March 3rd, 2022 in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune
Aimee Garcia moves down the aisle to a new patient while giving vaccines against COVID19 on Friday, March 4th, 2022 in Laredo, TX. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune

A spin class sparks a solution

Victor Trevino poses for a portrait on Friday, March 4th, 2022 in Laredo, TX. Victor and a fellow nurse would make quick work of giving an entire bus a vaccine against COVID19. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune
Passengers transfer between buses at a pick up and drop off location on Thursday, March 3rd, 2022 in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. Workers from Nuevo Laredo were transported to the international crossing point to receive vaccines against COVID19 as part of a program where left over vaccines from the U.S. were to be used instead of being wasted or expiring. Sergio Flores for The Texas Tribune

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