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Transgender Texans

Transgender Texas kids are terrified after governor orders that parents be investigated for child abuse

Some experts doubt that classifying gender-affirming care as child abuse would hold up in court, but families still feel targeted by Gov. Greg Abbott’s new order

Adelyn Vigil, 13, a transgender girl, poses for a photo in the Rio Grande Valley on Sunday, February 27, 2022. In response to Governor Abbott’s order for the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) to investigate parents that provide gender-affirming care to their kids, Adelyn says that, “The thought of me being separated makes me cry and to think that my mom could go to jail for it and not being able to see her anymore.”
Verónica G. Cárdenas for The Texas Tribune
Adelyn Vigil, 13, left, a transgender girl, her cousin Aylette Reyes, 13, center, and her mother Adamalis Vigil, 34, pass their time at her grandma’s home in the Rio Grande Valley on Sunday, February 27, 2022.
Verónica G. Cárdenas for The Texas Tribune

Riding a wave of anti-trans politics 

Second-guessing more care  

Libby Gonzales, a 7-year-old transgender girl, walks through the Capitol before testifying against SB 3 and SB 91, the "bathroom bills," before the Senate State Affairs Committee with her family on July 21, 2017.

Extremely rare 

DALLAS, TEXAS - Libby Gonzales, 11, was seven when she testified against the "bathroom bill" at the Texas Capitol.
DALLAS, TEXAS - Rachel Gonzales holds her daughter Libby Gonzales, 11, outside their home on June 26, 2021. Libby was seven when she testified against the "bathroom bill" at the Texas Capitol.

Their worst fear 

Adamalis Vigil, 34, holds a bracelet that she and her husband got for their daughter Adelyn Vigil, 13, who is a transgender girl, as they pose for a photo in the Rio Grande Valley on Sunday, February 27, 2022. Adamalis says that Governor Abbott’s order for the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) to investigate parents that provide gender-affirming care to their kids , “Hasn’t made me doubt myself as a parent because I know what it’s right for my child.” Adelyn says that, “The thought of me being separated makes me cry and to think that my mom could go to jail for it and not being able to see her anymore.”
Verónica G. Cárdenas for The Texas Tribune

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