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The Karankawa were said to be extinct. Now they’re reviving their culture — and fighting to protect their ancestors’ land.

Historians long thought the Karankawa people had disappeared. But now a group of descendants is fighting to protect a coastal area — where thousands of Karankawa artifacts were found — from an encroaching oil export facility.

Love Sanchez, of the Indigenous People of the Coastal Bend, participates in a prayer ceremony at McGee Beach in Corpus Chris…
Moda Ingleside Energy Center in Ingleside.
Chiara Sunshine Beaumont at the Circle Acres Nature Preserve in Austin on Sept. 18, 2021. Chiara held a cleansing ceremony a…

Artifacts threatened by encroaching development 

Images of artifacts found during an early archeological survey of McGloin's Bluff on the northeast point of Corpus Christi B…
Images of artifacts found during an early archeological survey of McGloin's Bluff on the northeast point of Corpus Christi B…
Patrick Nye shows his collection of Karankawa artifacts at his home in Ingleside. His home is located less than one mile fro…
Patrick Nye owns a collection of Karankawa artifacts at his home in Ingleside. His home is located less than one mile from t…
Wally Flores, of the Indigenous People of the Coastal Bend, participates in a prayer ceremony at McGee Beach in Corpus Chris…

The myth of “annihilation” 

The Indigenous People of the Coastal Bend gather at McGee Beach in Corpus Christi to protest the expansion of the Moda Ingle…

Reclaiming Karankawa history 

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