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Coronavirus in Texas

Desperate Texas doctors turn to antibody treatments to slow down surging COVID-19 hospitalizations

The infusions are more available and accessible to Texans than ever before, and new criteria for who can receive antibody treatment have led more doctors to prescribe it.

Dr. Fritz Thurmond speaks to Kathy Hardman as she waits a one-hour observation period after receiving a COVID-19 antibody infusion at Titus Regional Medical Center in Mount Pleasant on Aug. 19, 2021.
Isidro Bernardino receives a COVID-19 antibody infusion at the Titus Regional Medical Center in Mount Pleasant on Aug.  19, 2021.

COVID-19 surge prompts state to reopen infusion centers

New criteria mean more people qualify for therapy

Vaccine FAQs

  • Who is eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine?

  • Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe and effective?

  • Should I still get the vaccine if I've had COVID-19?

  • Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine in Texas?

  • Who can get a COVID-19 booster shot?

“It’s kept people out of the hospital”

Patients receive COVID-19 antibody infusions at Titus Regional Medical Center in Mount Pleasant on Aug. 19, 2021. The antibody infusion is performed at the earlier stages of infection, which can reduce the the chance of hospitalization by 70%.
Nurse practitioner Cheryl Shovan assists Melissa Skeen with her COVID-19 antibody infusion at the Titus Regional Medical Center in Mount Pleasant on Aug. 19, 2021.

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