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San Antonio built a pipeline to rural Central Texas to increase its water supply. Now local landowners say their wells are running dry.

A pipeline helped secure water for San Antonio for decades to come — at a potentially high cost to some rural residents who are losing groundwater to the big city. Is it a preview for the rest of the state as climate change brings more water scarcity and cities keep sprawling?

A well on the Scouras’ property in Lee County on July 12, 2021. The Scourases are two of many Lee County residents whose wat…
From left, Leslie Scouras, 63, and her husband Bob Scouras, 72, walk a path on their property in Lee County on July 12, 2021…
The Vista Ridge site in Burleson County on July 12, 2021.

Water levels sink

From left: Ronnie McKee, 75, and his wife Nancy McKee, 74, at their home in Lee County on July 12, 2021. The McKees are two …

San Antonio thirsts for security

Leslie Scouras, 63, walks along a path on her property in Lee County on July 12, 2021. Scouras is one of many Lee County res…

Texas’ “patchwork” of groundwater regulation

From left, Ronnie McKee, 75, and his wife Nancy McKee, 74, at their home in Lee County on July 12, 2021. The McKees are two …
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