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Broken Border

1,000 migrants a day made this tiny Guatemala town a smuggler’s paradise. The business has dried up.

Two Trump administration initiatives have driven down traffic, locals say: the “remain in Mexico” program requiring people to wait out their asylum cases south of the border, and the threat to slap tariffs on Mexico unless it cracked down on migrants crossing through it.

The main street in La Tecnica, Guatemala on Nov. 17, 2019. The street leads to a boat ramp on the Usumacinta river, which fo…

The Tribune's reporting for this project is supported by the Pulitzer Center.

The main street in La Tecnica, Guatemala on Nov. 17, 2019.
A group of migrants stop near a restaurant in La Tecnica, Guatemala. The group had recently exited a bus that arrived to La …

No migrants, no business

Boats are docked on the banks of the Usumacinta River in La Tecnica, Guatemala. Nov. 17, 2019.

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Marixa Garcia Ramos is a server at a restaurant in La Tecnica, Guatemala on Nov. 17, 2019.

Border arrests plummet

Oscar Marroquin owns a restaurant and operates boat tours in La Tecnica, Guatemala. Nov. 17, 2019.

“I heard the shot”

A photocopy of a photograph demonstrates Walter Alexander Sanchez in a hospital in Honduras after being assaulted by local g…
A photocopy of a photograph demonstrates where a bullet entered Walter Alexander Sanchezís face. Sanchez was assaulted whil…
An x-ray of Walter Alexander Sanchez jaw reveals a fragment of the bullet that entered his jaw. Sanchez was shot while worki…
Walter Alexander Sanchez holds up an x-ray demonstrating the damage inflicted by a bullet wound on his jaw. Sanchez fled Hon…
Walter Sanchez Reyes holds his daughter Maria Dolores Sanchez at a migrant shelter in southern Mexico. Sanchez was shot by g…

“People always come”

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