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Families Divided

Migrants seeking safe harbor in the U.S. must first survive shootouts and shakedowns in Mexico

Few would dispute that life has gotten tougher for people who are in the United States without legal permission. But in recent years, it’s grown even more dangerous for immigrants in Mexico — mostly Central Americans trying to make their way to the United States.

Nicaraguan migrant Bernardo Calero wraps a bandage around the leg of his son, Grisber, on Sept. 13, 2018, in Reynosa, Mexico…

Families Divided

The Trump administration's “zero tolerance” immigration policy, which led to the separation of children from adults who crossed the border illegally, has fueled a national outcry. Sign up for our ongoing coverage. Send story ideas to tips@texastribune.org.

 More in this series 

Impunity reigns

Fleeing Daniel Ortega

Nicaraguan migrant Grisber Calero was seriously injured in Reynosa, Mexico on Aug. 25, 2018, when uniformed assailants opene…

A big business

The Carias family decides where to spend the night after being ejected from Motel las Palmas in October 2016. The hotel oper…

Kilometer Marker 178

Nicaraguan migrant Grisber Calero, carrying a red and black backback, walks along a trail near the highway between Monterrey…

“I saw the bone”

Nicaraguan migrant Bernardo Calero told his brother in a WhatsApp message on the night of Aug. 25, 2018, that he was en rout…
Nicaraguan migrant Grisber Calero was seriously injured in Reynosa, Mexico on Aug. 25, 2018 when uniformed assailants opened…

“Mexico isn’t safe”

Immigration attorney Jodie Goodwin talks to Bernardo and Grisber Calero on the Mexican side of the international bridge in R…

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