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T-Squared: Tribune Editor-in-Chief Joins Pulitzer Board

I couldn't be happier to spread the word that the Tribune's fearless, visionary editor-in-chief, Emily Ramshaw, will soon take a seat on the Pulitzer Prize board — one of the most sought-after gigs in our industry.

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Call her Emily Pulitzer.

I couldn't be happier to spread the word that the Tribune's fearless, visionary editor-in-chief, Emily Ramshaw, will soon take a seat on the Pulitzer Prize board — one of the most sought-after gigs in our industry. It was announced today by Columbia University in New York, which administers the Pulitzers, that she's been elected to a three-year term. She will join the 18 other members in choosing the winners of the prestigious Pulitzer Prizes each year in journalism, books, drama and music.

It would be an understatement to say that this is an extraordinary honor, for Emily and for the Trib. It's a recognition that she matters, and that we matter — a validation of our nearly seven years of hard work at innovating in the creation and distribution of serious journalism and in developing a sustainable business model to pay for it, and of her role in guiding the troops with exceptional competence and the highest integrity in good times and bad. When Emily takes her seat, she will be the youngest member of the Pulitzer board, and the Trib will be the organization represented on the board that's been in business for the fewest number of years.

Already heralded across the country as one of the consequential women in media, Emily adds this feather to her cap at the end of a banner week for the Trib. Today's news comes just after our awesome team won three Online Journalism Awards, including General Excellence, and it comes just before our biggest, best Texas Tribune Festival ever, when the world gathers in Austin in full embrace of our public service mission.

In a release touting Emily's election to the Pulitzer board, co-chair Keven Ann Willey, editorial page editor and vice president of the Dallas Morning News, said she was chosen because she's an "outstanding journalist" and a "new media leader" whose "skills and perspectives are special assets in this digital age." All we can say is: Hear, hear.

Please join us in congratulating our colleague and friend on this richly deserved career moment.

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