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A Call for More Testing for Waterborne Diseases

In response to increasing waterborne disease outbreaks, the Global Water Pathogen Project will collect and disseminate information on water-related disease risks and intervention measures.

Water pours into a holding pond inside Rio Grande City’s new $12 million water treatment plant. Along the Texas-Mexico border, nearly 90,000 people are believed to still live without running water. An untold number more — likely tens of thousands, but no one is sure — often have running water of such poor quality that they cannot know what poisons or diseases it might carry.

In response to increasing waterborne disease outbreaks, the Global Water Pathogen Project will collect and disseminate information on water-related disease risks and intervention measures. The project, led by Michigan State University and UNESCO, involves more than 110 experts from 41 nations in the effort to compile updated information on pathogens in sewage and water and the tools available to destroy them. (TIME

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