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Cruz: Pray That Supreme Court Doesn't Legalize Gay Marriage

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz used the imminent Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage to make his case to a socially conservative group on Thursday.

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Summit in Nashua, N.H., on April 18, 2015.

WASHINGTON – U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz used the imminent Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage to make his case to a socially conservative group on Thursday.

Gay marriage, according to Cruz’s remarks to the Faith and Freedom Coalition, is one of many ways Democrats, the media and at times his Republican rivals persecute evangelical Christians.

“Religious liberty is under assault,” he said.

“I would encourage everyone here to be lifting up in prayer the court that they not engage in an act of naked and lawless judicial activism, tearing down the marriage laws adopted pursuant to the Constitution,” he added.

Texas’ junior senator touched on recent controversies about gay marriage in Indiana and Arkansas.

“Today’s Democratic Party, aided by their friends in the media, and aided even more by big business that decided it was good business to throw Christians overboard and abandon religious liberty, pounded upon leaderships there,” he said.

“I’ll tell you what was saddest: just how many Republicans ran for the hills,” he said. “More than a few Republicans, sadly even more than a few Republicans running for president in 2016, chose that moment somehow to go and rearrange their sock drawer.” 

Over and over in his sermon-like remarks, Cruz said “Morning is coming,” in reference to the moment President Obama will leave office.

It is a line from the Old Testament, but it also recalled President Ronald Reagan’s “Morning in America” campaign theme. Cruz often quotes the late president in his speeches and frequently says he is the best candidate to run from the Reagan playbook in a general election.

While he's polarizing to Democrats and independents, Cruz argues he has the potential to boost the evangelical voting base.

At this gathering, he made that case to the audience. 

“You have a circle of influence: friends, family, pastors," he said. "...There are right now about 90 million evangelicals in America. Fifty million evangelicals are staying home. Fifty million.”  

“It’s a real simple formula," he added. "If people of faith show up, if we stand for our faith and our liberty and the Constitution, we will win and turn the country around.”

Former Gov. Rick Perry, also a presidential contender, will address the group on Saturday morning. 

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