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Weekend Insider: Drug Runner Rehab, Reversed Verdict

A young woman, who may never be able to live on her own after a traffic accident, was awarded nearly $9 million by a jury — but the verdict was overturned. And a new juvenile facility will focus on teenagers who got involved in drug smuggling.

Michelle Gaines was 19 when she was hit by a truck hauling an oil rig in 2006. She was in the hospital for 14 months, and her father and lawyers say she now has the mental capacity of a 12-year-old. She may never be able to live on her own. A jury awarded her more than $8 million. An appeals court overturned the jury's verdict. Brandi Grissom explains this tragic and unusual case.

But first, Julián Aguilar takes us to Eagle Pass. Teenagers are being recruited by drug cartels to smuggle marijuana across the Texas-Mexico border. So many of these kids are getting busted that law enforcement doesn't have enough room to house the delinquents. It has led officials to take donations for a new facility, which is being built, in part, by county employees and teenagers who have already gotten in trouble.

Find these stories in the weekend editions of The New York Times and at texastribune.org.

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