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Liveblog: "Your Money, Your Vote" GOP Debate

Another GOP presidential debate, you say? Tell us about it. We'll be liveblogging tonight's "Your Money, Your Vote" debate, hosted by CNBC and the Michigan Republican Party, from the campus of Oakland University in Rochester, Mich.

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ROCHESTER HILLS, Mich. — Another GOP presidential debate, you say? Tell us about it. 

We'll be liveblogging tonight's "Your Money, Your Vote" debate, hosted by CNBC and the Michigan Republican Party, from the campus of Oakland University starting at 7 p.m.

Though the forum will largely center on jobs, taxes and the economy, it will be second-place Herman Cain's first debate performance following ever-growing revelations of years-old sexual harassment allegations.

Front-runner Mitt Romney, static in the polls, could take the opportunity to widen his lead. But look for Gov. Rick Perry and former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich — neck and neck for third place in an average of polls — to try to slip past Cain.  

Another GOP debate, in Spartanburg, South Carolina, is scheduled for Saturday night on CBS.

 

 

Liveblog

by Emily Ramshaw
We're just a few minutes away from the start of the debate. Perry looks like he'll be standing next to Herman Cain tonight, not next to shoulder-grabbing Romney.
by Emily Ramshaw
Strong applause for Herman Cain — some support from the audience.
by Emily Ramshaw
First question for Cain — big intake of breath — and it's about Italy's financial disaster.
by Emily Ramshaw
Ron Paul says the U.S. is in a debt crisis "never before seen in our history." If you prop up the economy, he says, you "prolong the agony." "You want to liquidate the debt. The debt is unsustainable."
by Emily Ramshaw
Slow going — lots of discussion, but 15 minutes in, no questions, or answers, from Rick Perry.
by Emily Ramshaw
Romney: "If I'm president... I will be true to my family." Is that a jab at Cain?
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry, in his first answer, says America is going to be America again. "We're not going to pick winners and losers from Washington, D.C. It doesn't make any difference whether it's Wall Street or whether it's some corporate entity or some European country. If you are too big to fail, you are too big." It sounds like a big line, but the audience doesn't appear to get it. Half-hearted applause.
by Jay Root
Gingrich says Ben Bernanke "ought to be fired as rapidly as possible."
by Emily Ramshaw
Big, big applause for Perry's third-place rival, Newt Gingrich. Rumble?
by Jay Root
Michele Bachmann makes another pitch for border fence, but debate focused tightly on economy and tax reform right now.
by Emily Ramshaw
The audience clearly backs up Cain on the sexual harassment allegations. Huge boos for the anchor; huge cheers for Cain.
by Jay Root
Big boos after CNBC panelist asks Herman Cain about sexual harrassment allegations.
by Jay Root
Cain says he's been hit with "unfounded allegations." Says people are "still very enthusiastic behind my candidacy" and "don't care about the character assassination. Studio audience clearly annoyed by questions.
by Emily Ramshaw
Well, with the Cain questions clearly answered for the night — put to bed by Romney — expect TV ratings to drop precipitously.
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry's really speaking in quick, vehement sound bites tonight. No rambling answers -- but you think he'd take a little bit more of his time.
by Jay Root
Perry plugs his flat tax, plays up Texan-ness by declaring: "We need to go out there and stick a big ole flag in the middle of America that says 'open for business again.' "
by Jay Root
Cain pulls out a decent one-liner when asked about possibility that 9-9-9 could end up being 19-19-19: "Tax codes do not raise taxes, politicians do."
by Emily Ramshaw
Romney, given a window to trash Perry's flat tax plan, instead trashes Obama economy and pitches his own ideas. Clever way to avoid turning over the mic to Perry.
by Emily Ramshaw
Spending is a tax on U.S. citizens, Ron Paul says. "You have to address the subject of spending." He proposes cutting $1 trillion out of the budget in five departments. "You have to get rid of price fixing," he said.
by Jay Root
Perry and Romney playing nice on TV but trashing each other in emails. Perry sends out email with headline, "Mitt Romney: 'Flat Tax a Tax Cut for Fat Cats.' " Romney issue attack on Perry's flat tax proposal. "Perry Plan Panned," it says.
by Emily Ramshaw
Romney, asked about why his economic plan doesn't involve housing, get's snippy: "It's because it's not a housing plan, it's a jobs plan."
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry's getting asked about about housing, and the negative numbers nationally. He's ready for that one: "There's not a negative number in Texas."
When asked what he'd do to make what's worked in Texas work nationally, he gets on an effective, applause-inducing soap box. "Let's get our energy freed up. Pull back all of those regulations. Everybody on this stage understands it's the regulatory world that's killing America."
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry, sensing an improving relationship with the audience, kept going on regulations — threw in a flat tax plan for good measure — and then went back to more regulations. "The next president of the United States has to go forward and pull back every regulation since 2008. Audit them for one thing. Is it creating jobs or is it killing jobs? If that regulation is killing jobs, do away with it."
by Emily Ramshaw
Gingrich sparring pretty incessantly with the moderators. Humorous.
by Jay Root
In post Obama-care world, Perry says people should be given "menu of options" in health care. He said hospitals need "incentives on health care rather sick care." On Medicaid, Perry said "you send it back to the states and let the states figure out to make Medicaid work ... we will do it safely, we will do it appropriately and we will save a ton of money."
by Emily Ramshaw
One hour in, Romney, and, better believe it, Gingrich, are running the show tonight. Everyone else is largely a non-player, and that certainly includes Perry.
by Emily Ramshaw
The Twitter-sphere is abuzz at how much of a non-factor Perry is tonight.
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry just had a major flub. He was trying to name the three agencies of government he'd do away with, and he couldn't. "Oops," he said, turning visibly red.
by Jay Root
Huge stumble for Perry in debate. He says "oops" after failing to remember which of the three federal departments to shut down. Commerce, Education and ... couldn't remember.
by Emily Ramshaw
The full quote: "I will tell you, it's three agencies of government when I get there that are gone. Commerce, education, and..." Ron Paul tries to help him. "The EPA?" Nope, not the EPA. Perry says he simply can't remember, and, red-faced, says, "Oops."
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry's being asked again — said "that was the department of energy I was reaching for a while ago."
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry's now being asked the order in which he would cut certain agencies and programs. He — clearly now spooked of offering any specifics — just launches into his usual comments on Social Security, and says elderly people, seniors, don't need to be worried about losing benefits.
by Emily Ramshaw
You've got to wonder what's going through Perry's head right now, as the Twittersphere, right and left, largely considers this an unrecoverable blunder.
by Emily Ramshaw
Perry on the back-scratching relationship in Washington: "We have a culture in Washington, D.C. where these corporate lobbyists have cozy relationships with the people they're regulating."
by Emily Ramshaw
That's all from the debate. Stay tuned for post debate reaction from the Perry camp — it'll be a doozy.
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