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Poll: Against School Cuts, But Not Sure They'll Hurt

Heading into the 82nd legislative session, 88 percent of Texas voters surveyed in a poll hoped for more public education funding. It’s not likely to surprise anyone, but now we can officially say: Nothing’s changed.

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Heading into the 82nd legislative session, 88 percent of Texas voters surveyed by the Texas Poll hoped for more public education funding. It’s not likely to surprise anyone, but now we can officially say: Nothing’s changed.

In a survey conducted by the same firm in July on behalf of the Texas Association of School Boards, 90 percent of Texans say public education could use some more state money.

Furthermore, they appear to be placing the blame at the feet of legislators. Eighty-five percent said lawmakers did not make education a priority, and 75 percent believe lawmakers should not have cut funding. On the flip side, 4 percent said cuts were necessary.

A local tax to boost public ed funding got the support of 69 percent of Texans (76 percent of those with kids in schools). 

Not everyone expects to feel the pain of budget cuts. Only 48 percent — or as a TASB press release said, “nearly half” — expect their local school district to be “affected greatly.” Forty-one percent said their district would be affected but could make it work. Five percent did not expect any change. 

The telephone survey polled 1,000 adult Texans. It has a margin of error of +/- 3 percentage points.

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