Anti-Bullying Bill Clears Another Hurdle

As the parents of Asher Brown watched, the Senate today unanimously approved a bill meant to prevent bullying in schools. If the House, as expected, approves some changes the Senate made to the measure, it will go to Gov. Rick Perry's desk for a final signature.

Asher Brown took his own life on Sept. 23, 2010 after bullies at school tormented him. He was 13 years old.

[Editor's Note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the status of the anti-bullying bill. It must return to the Texas House before going to the governor's desk.]

As the parents of Asher Brown watched, the Senate today unanimously approved a bill meant to prevent bullying in schools. If the House, as expected, approves some changes the Senate made to the measure, it will go to Gov. Rick Perry's desk for a final signature.

Brown, an eighth grader at a Cypress-Fairbanks middle school, shot himself last fall after what his parents said was two years of harassment for his small size, religion and perceived sexuality. "Our real goal is the prevention, to deter these acts going forward," said state Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston.

Under HB 1942, schools would be required to develop specific bullying policies. Schools would be allowed to transfer students who engage in bullying to other schools or classrooms, and they would be required to report acts of bullying.

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