Skip to main content

The Midday Brief: May 9, 2011

Your afternoon reading: Senate approves concealed carry for legislators; tweaked voter ID bill gets final approval; Obama signaling he'll campaign in Texas

Texas Capitol

Your afternoon reading:

  • "The Texas Senate this afternoon approved a final version of the controversial Voter ID bill, including a special state election identification card that will be issued by state police for voters who have no other ID." — Voter ID bill gets final OK, Postcards
  • "The Texas House is debating a bill called the 'loser pays' bill, which attempts to cut down on frivolous lawsuits by requiring plaintiffs who lose a lawsuit to bear all the costs, including attorneys’ fees. But State Rep. Craig Eiland, D-Galveston, offered — just to make a point — an amendment to rename the bill the 'loser-pays-but-sometimes-the-winner pays-too' bill." — What’s in a name?, Texas Politics
  • "That was an interesting visit to the White House earlier this year by Dallas Rep. Rafael Anchia. Anchia and fellow Democratic House member Trey Martinez Fischer of San Antonio were guests of President Obama at a Super Bowl watch party. … As we reported today Anchia urged the president: Don't write off Texas in 2012. 'He looked surprised, almost indignant,' Anchia recalled. 'He said, "You better believe I'm not going to write off Texas. We're going to compete."'" — Eyes of the White House are on Texas, Trail Blazers

New in The Texas Tribune:

  • "Fraudulent fishermen better reel it in. The Senate passed a bill today to make cheating in a fishing tournament up to a third-degree felony, sending the measure on to the governor." — Fraudulent Fishermen Could Face Felony
  • "At stores in Brownsville, customers must pay $1 for plastic bags — so many bring their own, or go without. The policy, which also restricts paper bags, has removed hundreds of thousands of bags daily — but not without controversy." — Brownsville Debates the Merits of Plastic Bag Ban

Texas Tribune donors or members may be quoted or mentioned in our stories, or may be the subject of them. For a complete list of contributors, click here.

Quality journalism doesn't come free

Yes, I'll donate today