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The Midday Brief: Nov. 10, 2010

Your afternoon reading: good (long-term) economic news for Texas, border violence and George W. Bush on Islam

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Your afternoon reading:

  • "Texas lost hundreds of thousands of jobs last year as it stumbled through the deep national recession. But the state is likely to shine as the nation's economic growth leader over the next decade, according to research and forecasting firm IHS Global Insight." — Texas likely to lead nation in economic growth, researchers forecast, The Dallas Morning News
  • "The Mexican military took the life of 'Tony Tormenta,' the gangster who ran the Gulf Cartel drug-trafficking syndicate, but the deceased capo's rivals — already known for beheadings and public displays of murdered corpses — are poised to take the territory that borders South Texas." — Zetas brewing greater border violence, Houston Chronicle
  • "Matt Lauer quoted remarks George W. Bush made shortly after 9/11 that said Islam should not be equated with terrorism, and then pushed for the former president’s view on the current controversy. 'There’s a lot of events, and a lot of opportunities for me to speak out over the next years and I have chosen not to. And the reason I’ve chosen not to is I don’t want to intrude upon my successor’s ability to get the job done,' Bush said." — Bush ducks giving views on Ground Zero mosque, but doesn’t shy from tax debate, The Texas Independent
  • "Of the 21 House Democrats blown away in last week's election, 13 represented districts that Barack Obama couldn't carry in 2008 — and of those, all but three were out-fundraised by their Republican challengers." — House Dems from GOP tilting areas wiped out, Trail Blazers

New in The Texas Tribune:

  • "After a media tour in New York, Gov. Rick Perry returned to Texas to promote his new book, Fed Up! San Antonio supporters were not only eager to read the book but hopeful that the governor would run for president." — Perry Brings "Fed Up" Book Tour Back to Texas

 

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