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TribBlog: Court Rules Against Creationism as Science Ed Degree

On its website, the Dallas-based Institute for Creation Research promises an education that is "Biblical. Accurate. Certain." But there's one thing they can't promise: a master's degree in science education.

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On its website, the Institute for Creation Research promises an education that is "Biblical. Accurate. Certain."  But there's one thing they can't promise: a master's degree in science education.

In 2008, after the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board denied their request for a state certificate of authority to offer such a degree, the Dallas-based Christian institution took the THECB to court. On Friday, a U.S. District Court ruled against the ICR, upholding the THECB's right to refuse them certification.

According to the judge's summary of the case, Higher Education Commissioner Raymund Paredes refused the request because he "found the proposed program’s curriculum was inconsistent with the standards or conventions of science and science education, and secondly, he found the program’s curriculum was inconsistent with the Board’s standards ... relating to curriculum."

It seems the ICR may have acted as their own worst enemy as the case proceeded.  In his ruling (available on the right) the judge writes, "It appears that although the Court has twice required Plaintiff to re-plead and set forth a short and plain statement of the relief requested, Plaintiff is entirely unable to file a complaint which is not overly verbose, disjointed, incoherent, maundering, and full of irrelevant information."

An ICR spokesperson sent the following statement via e-mail:

The Institute for Creation Research has received the ruling of Judge Sam Sparks from the U.S. District Court in Austin in the case ICR Graduate School v. Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board et al. The attorneys and leadership of ICR associated with this case are currently reviewing Judge Sparks’ ruling and we are weighing our options regarding future action in this matter.  In addition to other options, ICRGS has 30 days in which to file an appeal with the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. ICR has no further comment at this time.

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Reference

ICR v. THECB Ruling

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