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2010: The Tea Party's GOP Debate

The GOP gubernatorial candidates have already gone head to head to head in televised debates put on by KERA and BELO. But why settle for two debates, when you can have three?

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The GOP gubernatorial candidates — Gov. Rick Perry, U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, and Debra Medina — have already gone head to head to head in televised debates put on by KERA and BELO. But why settle for two debates, when you can have three? Common Sense Texans, the network that connects Texas's many tea parties, has shouldered the burden of rounding out the GOP gubernatorial primary debate season.

Their "virtual debate" takes the form of a series of web videos in which the candidates — filmed separately — each take a stab at the same ten questions. Clocking in at over an hour and a quarter, it's the longest debate of the three.  The questions were "prepared by grassroots conservatives around the state." Some are reminiscent of the previous debates, while others are decidedly not. Here's a sampling:

"The concept of American Exceptionalism has been completely removed from our textbooks.  Instead, children are taught to be global citizens.  Do you agree this is the correct path?  If not, how would you correct this systemic problem?  What is your stance on vouchers and school choice?" - Lorie Medina, Dallas Tea Party

 

"The federal government has exceeded its constitutionally enumerated powers for many years, frequently infringing on those rights reserved to the States respectively, or the people.  Specifically, as the chief executive of the state of Texas, how will you contribute to reversing the transfer of power from our people and state to the federal government and restore our lost sovereignty?" - Andrew Piziali, Allen Area Patriots

 

"Specifically - by major program categories - how much do you intend to reduce state spending?  If you say it can't or shouldn't be done, why not?" - Tammy Blair, Tyler Tea Party

 

"Tell us about a mistake you have made in your public life, why it was a mistake and what you did to correct it." - Maria Acosta, Central Texas 9-12 Project

 

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