The Playlist: Going to Maryland

Gov. Rick Perry at an event in San Antonio on July 9, 2013, to announce that he won't run for re-election.
Gov. Rick Perry at an event in San Antonio on July 9, 2013, to announce that he won't run for re-election.

In his latest attempt to lure out-of-state companies to Texas, Gov. Rick Perry has his sights set on the Old Line State — so we start this week's news-inspired playlist with "Going to Maryland," by The Mountain Goats.

The easiest way to enjoy the playlist is to download Spotify, which is a free program. But even without it, you can still follow along. Here are this week's other selections: 

Perry has designated September as "Texas Craft Spirits Month," so we included "Tequila," by The Champs. We have Pat Green's "College" as a nod to the release of the U.S. News & World Report university rankings.

The Trib's Ross Ramsey noticed that of the 11 Republicans who helped Joe Straus become speaker of the Texas House, only four are left, which made us think of "Where Are All My Friends?" by Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes.  Jim Henson and Joshua Blank penned a column wondering if Democrats were paying adequate attention to suburban women, so we added Ben Folds' "Rockin' the Suburbs."

In Texas oilfields, thieves targeting batteries that power pipeline monitors are a growing problem, so we have "Been Caught Stealing," by Jane's Addiction. That's followed by City and Colour's "Hope for Now," a nod to an inmate facing execution in January who hopes a law passed this year will allow him to produce evidence showing that the murder for which he was convicted could have been a tragic accident.

Alana Rocha took a look at — and a ride on — the low flows of the Guadalupe River, prompting the inclusion of Gary P. Nunn's "Guadalupe Days." Meanwhile, a measles outbreak has led to renewed calls for immunization legislation — and inspired the addition of Björk's "Virus" to the playlist.

We close with Professor Longhair's "Big Chief" in honor of Justice Nathan Hecht, who will replace Wallace Jefferson as chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court.

Enjoy!

Texas Tribune donors or members may be quoted or mentioned in our stories, or may be the subject of them. For a complete list of contributors, click here.