Tribpedia: Water Supply

Population growth and several droughts in the late 1990s and early 2000s led to more concern over Texas's water supply. Debate over the issue typically finds landowners on one side, environmentalists on the other. Environmental groups support restrictions on water pumping and water use, because droughts proved the risk of a low water supply, and because of the risk ...

Data App: Track Texas Reservoir Levels

Texas endured the worst drought in recorded state history in 2011 and has yet to bounce back. Some of the state's reservoirs are getting so low they are close to setting records: Lake Travis' water level sits at 622 feet above sea level, only eight feet above the record low set in 1951. Our auto-updating map visualizes the current state of Texas reservoirs.

A map of the proposed pipeline that will deliver 16 billion gallons of water annually from underneath Burleson County to San Antonio, about 140 miles away.
A map of the proposed pipeline that will deliver 16 billion gallons of water annually from underneath Burleson County to San Antonio, about 140 miles away.

Vista Ridge Parent Company Enters Pre-Bankruptcy

The financially troubled Spanish company whose subsidiary is supposed to build a massive water pipeline to serve San Antonio entered into the initial phases of bankruptcy proceedings Wednesday, raising questions about the viability of the controversial project. 

League of Independent Voters of Texas Executive Director, Linda Cirtus, looks onto the San Antonio City Council meeting moments after stating her case against the Vista Ridge Water Supply Project to the city council on Wednesday.
League of Independent Voters of Texas Executive Director, Linda Cirtus, looks onto the San Antonio City Council meeting moments after stating her case against the Vista Ridge Water Supply Project to the city council on Wednesday.

San Antonio City Council Hikes Water Rates

Amid strong objections from residents and robust backing from the local business community, the San Antonio City Council on Wednesday unanimously — albeit cautiously — approved plans for a sizable water rate increase. The increase will pay, in part, for a controversial, $3.4 billion pipeline local officials say is crucial to the city’s long-term water security.

Texas Supreme Court Justices Paul Green, left, and Chief Justice Nathan Hecht listen to oral arguments Sept. 1 in Texas' appeal of a 2014 ruling that struck down its system of funding public schools as unconstitutional.
Texas Supreme Court Justices Paul Green, left, and Chief Justice Nathan Hecht listen to oral arguments Sept. 1 in Texas' appeal of a 2014 ruling that struck down its system of funding public schools as unconstitutional.

High Court Hears From Ranch, Lubbock in Water Case

After hearing oral arguments Wednesday, the Texas Supreme Court will consider whether a provision in oil-and-gas law that protects landowners who don’t own the minerals beneath their property should also apply to those who don’t own the groundwater. 

Reveal Radio: But Not a Drop to Drink

For decades, residents of El Cenizo and Rio Bravo along the Texas-Mexico border have struggled to obtain safe, reliable drinking water. A new treatment plant was supposed to help, but politics got in the way. This story is part of a collaboration between The Texas Tribune and Reveal, a new public radio show and podcast from the Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.

The Hearts Bluff Mitigation Bank as pictured with the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir.
The Hearts Bluff Mitigation Bank as pictured with the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir.

Water Board Moves to Resolve Reservoir Conflict

Disagreeing with Dallas-Fort Worth-area water officials, the Texas Water Development Board decided on Wednesday that a years-long conflict over a yet-to-be-built reservoir in the region’s 50-year water plan is serious enough that it should be resolved

Local residents sparked monikers including "Save Our Wells" and "It's Trinity Water, Not 'Infinity' Water" in their fight against a Houston-based company's plans to pump millions of gallons of water per day from the Trinity Aquifer in western Hays County.
Local residents sparked monikers including "Save Our Wells" and "It's Trinity Water, Not 'Infinity' Water" in their fight against a Houston-based company's plans to pump millions of gallons of water per day from the Trinity Aquifer in western Hays County.

New Law May Not Thwart Hays County Water Project

A bill that passed late in the legislative session gave some residents and officials hope that they can kill a controversial water-pumping project in western Hays County. But there's no guarantee that Houston-based Electro Purification won't ultimately be able to proceed with its plan.

The Brazos River in Knox County during the summer of 2011.
The Brazos River in Knox County during the summer of 2011.

Texas Facing Major Climate Change Impacts, Study Finds

A sharp increase in heat-related deaths and storm-related losses. A significant decrease in worker productivity and crop yields. A new climate change study paints a bleak picture for Texas over the coming decades — if nothing is done to address the much-debated warming trend. And not everyone is buying it.

 

In Texas, Drought is Done

For the first time in more than five years, Texas no longer is in a drought. While less than 3 percent of the state remains “abnormally dry,” according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, drought has disappeared from every other part of the Texas. Just three months ago, more than 35 percent of the Lone Star State was in some form of drought.