Tribpedia: Texas Trial Lawyers Association

Tribpedia

The Texas Trial Lawyers Association (TTLA) is an organization made up of plaintiff's attorneys. The group was founded in 1949.

The TTLA is a powerful force in Texas politics. Trial lawyers, both individually and through their political action committee, have contributed millions to Texas candidates for public office. They largely, though not exclusively, support Democratic candidates and political action ...

Read More...

Trial Lawyers Call Urgent Meeting to Discuss Criticism

In the wake of criticism from former Texas Trial Lawyers Association President Steve Mostyn, the association has scheduled a meeting for Wednesday in Austin to address concerns. Critics say TTLA is spending too much on executive compensation and not putting enough of its resources into electing candidates who would fight to undo years of lawsuit restrictions.

Trial Lawyers Make Big Play In GOP Races

Texas Weekly

Trial lawyers, the most reliable and generous source of cash for Texas Democrats, generally sit out Republican primaries. But this year the are pouring huge sums into key Senate races, hoping to elect Republicans who are more friendly to their agenda than the establishment-preferred GOP candidates.

State Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, speaking to the Senate after being appointed chairman of the conference committee on the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association on June 27, 2011.
State Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, speaking to the Senate after being appointed chairman of the conference committee on the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association on June 27, 2011.

TWIA Deal Ready for Final Vote

State legislators say they've reached a compromise on reform of the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association, potentially averting a second special session this summer.

State Rep. Craig Eiland (r), D-Galveston, speaks against HB274 the lawsuit reform bill as Rep. Brandon Creighton, R-Conroe, listens on May 9, 2011.
State Rep. Craig Eiland (r), D-Galveston, speaks against HB274 the lawsuit reform bill as Rep. Brandon Creighton, R-Conroe, listens on May 9, 2011.

Loser-Pays Bill Clears Texas House

Texas got one step closer today to becoming one of the few states with a rule that awards legal fees to prevailing parties in lawsuits. 

Texas State Representative Brandon Creighton, who chairs the House Select Committee on State Sovereignty, during a press conference on the Tenth Amendment.
Texas State Representative Brandon Creighton, who chairs the House Select Committee on State Sovereignty, during a press conference on the Tenth Amendment.

"Loser Pays" a Winner in the Texas Legislature?

Advocates say requiring the losing parties in litigation to pay their opponents’ legal fees is the cure for courts choked with the costs of “junk” lawsuits.

Connie Spears had to have both legs amputated above the knee, and blames an emergency room doctor for missing a critical diagnosis. The San Antonio woman's search for an attorney to take her case has been futile.
Connie Spears had to have both legs amputated above the knee, and blames an emergency room doctor for missing a critical diagnosis. The San Antonio woman's search for an attorney to take her case has been futile.

Injured ER Patients Can't Find Attorneys, Blame Tort Reform

The tort reform state lawmakers passed in 2003 made it more difficult for patients to win damages in any health care setting, but none more so than emergency rooms, where plaintiffs must prove doctors acted with "willful and wanton" negligence. Tort reform advocates say the law is needed to protect ER doctors operating in volatile environments. But medical malpractice attorneys argue the threshold is nearly impossible to cross. “You’d have to be a Nazi death camp guard to meet this standard,” says one.

Steve Mostyn Confronts Joe Nixon in Galveston Courtroom

Decorum broke down on Monday before a hearing began in Galveston County Court concerning a case involving plaintiffs' attorney Steve Mostyn, the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association (TWIA), and state Rep. Larry Taylor, R-Friendswood. Mostyn — one of the state's leading trial lawyers and Democratic donors — confronts Taylor's attorney, Joe Nixon, who in his former life as a legislator authored a 2003 tort reform bill limiting lawsuit damages. Mostyn berates Nixon about how he offered his services unsolicited to Taylor, who has sought to make public the fees earned by Mostyn and other lawyers who sued TWIA. Mostyn compares it to oft-criticized client recruitment by plaintiffs' lawyers (ambulance chasing, in other words).

High Court: Broken Bed Falls Under Malpractice Cap

Is a hospital bed an integral part of medical care? As a federal judge considers the constitutionality of Texas’ 2003 medical malpractice reform — and Gov. Rick Perry campaigns for more lawsuit restrictions — the state Supreme Court has ruled that hospital injuries seemingly unrelated to doctor error can fall under Texas’ stringent medical malpractice caps. Some legal observers say the decision is a perversion of legislative intent, but tort reform advocates contend the high court simply closed a huge loophole in liability reforms.

An Interview with Democratic Donor Steve Mostyn

Already the state's single largest Democratic donor this campaign cycle, the Houston attorney has pledged to contribute at least $3 million to the party and its causes this year and has no intention of turning off the faucet. The man behind the Back to Basics PAC's "coward" ad sat down with the Tribune last week to talk about why he feels the need to give, the influence of money in Texas politics, how "trial lawyer" became a perjorative and what he really thinks of the Democrats' chances this fall.
The best of our best from the week of July 12th.
The best of our best from the week of July 12th.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of July 12, 2010

Grissom's three-part series (here, here and here) on prosperity and peril along the U.S.-Mexico border, Hu on the Division of Workers' Compensation audit report, Stiles puts more than 3,000 personal disclosure forms filed by politicians, candidates and state officials online, M. Smith on attempts to curb the practice of barratry (better known as ambulance chasing), Ramsey interviews the chair of the Texas Libertarian Party, Hamilton on attempts to improve the success rates of community colleges, Galbraith on whether electric deregulation has helped or hurt Texans, Aguilar talks to a chronicler of the bloody narco-wars and Ramshaw on doctors who most often prescribe antipsychotic drugs to the state's neediest patients: The best of our best from July 12 to 16, 2010.