Tribpedia: Secession Controversy

Tribpedia

The secession controversy refers to the fallout from Gov. Rick Perry's remarks that hinted Texas could secede from the Union. The remarks were made at a tax day rally in April 2009 in Austin.

Perry said he thought the U.S. was still a "great union," but also said, "if Washington continues to thumb their nose at the American ...

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A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.
A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.

White House Responds to Texas Secession Petition

The White House, responding to calls for secession from Texas and seven other states, has called for healthy debate, but to not let "that debate tear us apart."

Gov. Rick Perry campaigns at the Hamburg Inn restaurant in downtown Iowa City.
Gov. Rick Perry campaigns at the Hamburg Inn restaurant in downtown Iowa City.

For Perry, Inconsistencies in States' Rights Mantra

Gov. Rick Perry is working hard to position himself as the leading Republican champion of the 10th Amendment. But he has at times been inconsistent in applying those beliefs, drawing criticism from some states’ rights advocates and raising questions even among fellow Republicans about whether his stance is as much campaign positioning as a philosophical commitment.

A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.
A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.

Texas Won't Secede — But It Won't Shut Up Either

Texas leaders aren't talking about secession, after an outbreak of conversation about it a couple of years ago. But the germ of the idea remains in the anti-federalist talking points that fueled Gov. Rick Perry’s re-election campaign last year and provided the outline for his book, “Fed Up!” The governor will make his State of the State speech to the Legislature next week, and attacking the power of the federal government is likely to be a central theme.

Sam Houston, Texas Secession — and Robert E. Lee

No secession ball will mark the day. Nor, it appears, are any other commemorative events planned by Texas. But 150 years ago today, on Feb.  1, 1861, a state convention voted overwhelmingly to secede from the Union, against the fervent wishes of Gov. Sam Houston. Caught in the mess was one Robert E. Lee, a federal officer in what had become a rebel state.