Tribpedia: Rick Perry

James Richard "Rick" Perry, the longest-serving governor in Texas history, was sworn in as the state's 47th chief executive on Dec. 21, 2000, replacing then-Gov. George W. Bush upon his ascendancy to the White House. Perry was elected to a four-year term in 2002 and re-elected in 2006 and 2010. On July 8, 2013, Perry announced he would not ...

Sizing Up a Rick Perry White House Bid

There’s a sort of collective disbelief within the Texas political establishment about Gov. Rick Perry testing the uncertain waters of a presidential campaign. But if critics have learned nothing else about Perry, they should know this: Underestimate him at your peril. With Perry publicly coy about a White House run, experts are sizing up a potential candidacy by America's longest-serving governor.

Video: Perry, Straus, Dewhurst Press Conference

Gov. Rick Perry, House Speaker Joe Straus and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst joined forces Tuesday to reflect on the regular legislative session that ended on Monday. "If all we do is hold the line on taxes and balance the budget with cuts, that's a pretty amazing accomplishment," Perry said, before addressing questions about the special session and deflecting a question about whether he thinks he can beat President Barack Obama. Watch our raw video from the 13-minute press conference. 

State Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, completes her filibuster at midnight of SB1811 on May 29, 2011.
State Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, completes her filibuster at midnight of SB1811 on May 29, 2011.

Summer School Ahead for Texas Legislators

Lawmakers were hoping to get out of Austin with their business done, without the prospect of a special session this summer. Fat chance. Even without an unfinished 2012-13 budget to bring them back, Gov. Rick Perry had already set the table for a special legislative this summer.

State Rep. Armando Walle, D-Houston, with a copy of the Texas House Practice rule book as he listens to debate on SB1811, the fiscal matters bill, on May 29, 2011.
State Rep. Armando Walle, D-Houston, with a copy of the Texas House Practice rule book as he listens to debate on SB1811, the fiscal matters bill, on May 29, 2011.

Liveblog: Make-or-Break Day for the Texas State Budget

With less than two days left in the legislative session, lawmakers set out to pay for the budget by passing one more piece of legislation. Without that legislation — SB 1811 — the budget doesn't balance and lawmakers will be forced to come back in a special session. It passed in the House, but was undone by a Senate filibuster.

Gov. Rick Perry outside the House chamber on May 28, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry outside the House chamber on May 28, 2011.

Updated: Windstorm Negotiations Fail

The marathon negotiations over the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association failed to produce a bill, probably prompting a special session later this summer over that issue. The last sticking points were over when and how much to compensate policyholders and their lawyers and became a proxy fight for trial lawyers and tort reformers.

The Texas Capitol in the twilight of the 82nd legislative session.
The Texas Capitol in the twilight of the 82nd legislative session.

20 Weeks in Texas in Which the Budget Held Sway

The 82nd Texas Legislature’s regular session ends as it started, with lawmakers arguing about a shrunken state budget and redistricting. With Republicans operating with a supermajority in the House and a commanding majority in the Senate, there was little doubt that the GOP would be able to impose its will. What was new was the power exerted by the Tea Party movement.

Gov. Rick Perry speaks to the press after leaving a school finance meeting between leaders in the House and Senate May 27, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry speaks to the press after leaving a school finance meeting between leaders in the House and Senate May 27, 2011.

Perry: Session on Congressional Maps Possible

Gov. Rick Perry opened the door to a special session on Congressional redistricting — but only if leaders agree to a map in advance. If the Legislature doesn't produce a map, it will fall to the federal courts to produce a new map to adjust for huge population gains.

Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signs the Voter ID on May 27, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signs the Voter ID on May 27, 2011.

Gov. Rick Perry Flirting With White House Run

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, in his boldest statement yet about a possible run for national office, said Friday he will think about launching a campaign for president in coming days. "I'm going to think about it," Perry said. He quickly added, "I think about a lot of things."

Michael Quinn Sullivan
Michael Quinn Sullivan

Conservative "Outsiders" Have Inside Track in Texas

His nickname around the Texas Capitol is "mucus." It’s a play on Michael Quinn Sullivan’s initials — MQS — but the moniker is fitting on at least two levels: It underscores how much of an irritant the conservative activist has become to politicians who dare buck his Tea Party orthodoxy. It also says something about Sullivan’s staying power in Republican-ruled Texas. They can’t get rid of him.

 

Gov. Rick Perry makes a playful salute to the son of State Rep. Craig Eiland, D-Galveston, as he walked through the House chamber on his way to a meeting with House Speaker Joe Straus at noon on May 19, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry makes a playful salute to the son of State Rep. Craig Eiland, D-Galveston, as he walked through the House chamber on his way to a meeting with House Speaker Joe Straus at noon on May 19, 2011.

Hispanic House Republicans Endorse Perry for President

Rick Perry has said he's not running for president, but state Rep. Aaron Peña, chairman of the Hispanic Republican Conference, hopes his group's support might change the governor's mind.

For Some Texas Republicans, Federal Action is Payback

Sen. Dan Patrick says he knows why the federal government has intervened on two key bills facing state lawmakers in the final days of the legislative session: “retribution.” Retribution for GOP leaders’ efforts to stop “intrusive” TSA screenings. Retribution for a flurry of anti-federal health reform and state’s rights bills aimed at pushing back against the Obama administration. But is it that simple?