Tribpedia: Rick Perry

James Richard "Rick" Perry, the longest-serving governor in Texas history, was sworn in as the state's 47th chief executive on Dec. 21, 2000, replacing then-Gov. George W. Bush upon his ascendancy to the White House. Perry was elected to a four-year term in 2002 and re-elected in 2006 and 2010. On July 8, 2013, Perry announced he would not ...

Gov. Rick Perry delivering his State of the State address on Feb. 8, 2011
Gov. Rick Perry delivering his State of the State address on Feb. 8, 2011

LiveBlog: Perry's State of the State

Gov. Rick Perry delivered his sixth State of the State speech today, addressing a joint session of the Texas House and Senate, and selling the state's fiscal troubles as an opportunity to make government more efficient. Perry offered a litany of proposals, from challenging Texas colleges and universities to offer a $10,000 bachelor's degree to recommending suspending funding for the Texas Historial Commission and the Texas Commission on the Arts.

Word cloud aggregate of Rick Perry's State of the State speeches from 2001 to 2011.
Word cloud aggregate of Rick Perry's State of the State speeches from 2001 to 2011.

Visualizing Rick Perry's State of the State

Gov. Rick Perry has delivered five previous State of the State speeches. Has his emphasis on certain words and themes changed over the years? We created word clouds of the past addresses to find out. 

Word cloud aggregate of Rick Perry's State of the State speeches from 2001 to 2009.
Word cloud aggregate of Rick Perry's State of the State speeches from 2001 to 2009.

Perry to Push Texas Colleges to Offer $10,000 Degree

Gov. Rick Perry will deliver his sixth State of the State speech later this morning, challenging the state's colleges and universities to offer a $10,000 bachelor's degree, including books. The higher education proposal is part of a call for a streamlined and more efficient state budget; Perry will try to sell the state's fiscal troubles as an opportunity to reshape the government.

Timothy Wayne Adams, convicted of murdering his 19-month-old son, is scheduled to die by lethal injection on Feb. 22, 2011.
Timothy Wayne Adams, convicted of murdering his 19-month-old son, is scheduled to die by lethal injection on Feb. 22, 2011.

Veteran Who Shot Baby Seeks Clemency

He was an Army veteran and a Houston security guard who had never been arrested until February 2002, when a fight with his wife sent Timothy Adams into a suicidal spiral. During a stand-off with police, Adams fatally shot his 19-month-old son twice in the chest — landing him a spot on death row.

A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.
A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.

Texas Won't Secede — But It Won't Shut Up Either

Texas leaders aren't talking about secession, after an outbreak of conversation about it a couple of years ago. But the germ of the idea remains in the anti-federalist talking points that fueled Gov. Rick Perry’s re-election campaign last year and provided the outline for his book, “Fed Up!” The governor will make his State of the State speech to the Legislature next week, and attacking the power of the federal government is likely to be a central theme.

House Speaker Joe Straus, Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst
House Speaker Joe Straus, Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst

Perry Says Sanctuary Cities Issue Misinterpreted

Border lawmakers who oppose Gov. Rick Perry's call to abolish “sanctuary cities” in Texas are misinterpreting his stance on the issue, according to his aides. They say the governor wants peace officers in Texas to have the option to inquire about a person's immigration status, but would oppose laws that require them to ask — what his office referred to as Arizona-style legislation. It’s all about “discretion,” a spokeswoman says.

Gov. Rick Perry as the keynote speaker at The Annual Texas Rally for Life at the Capitol on  January 22, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry as the keynote speaker at The Annual Texas Rally for Life at the Capitol on January 22, 2011.

Why Put These Issues on the Emergency List?

Abortion politics is back on center stage, with Gov. Rick Perry putting it, voter photo ID, state support for a balanced federal budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution, eminent domain and a ban on sanctuary cities at the top of his list of priorities. Why?

Business Leaders Sound Alarm About Education Cuts

Lawmakers will soon take an ax to the state budget, but business leaders are hoping one big-ticket item will be spared. At its annual conference in Austin this week, the Texas Association of Business sounded warnings about potential cuts to public education. Erika Aguilar of KUT News reports.

State Rep. Jim Pitts, R-Waxahachie, lays out House Bill 1.
State Rep. Jim Pitts, R-Waxahachie, lays out House Bill 1.

More a Call to Arms Than a Budget

Whatever budget lawmakers eventually approve will serve as the working blueprint for the state for the two years starting in September. But the budget released last week isn’t a blueprint — it’s a political document. It marks the shift from the theoretical rhetoric of the campaigns to the reality of government.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 1/17/11

The Trib staff on the sweeping cuts in the proposed House budget, Grissom on what's lost and not found at the Department of Public Safety, Galbraith on the wind power conundrum, Hamilton on higher ed's pessimistic budget outlook, Stiles and Swicegood debut an incredibly useful bill tracker app, Ramsey interviews Rick Perry on the cusp of his second decade as governor, Aguilar on a Mexican journalist's quest for asylum in the U.S., Ramshaw on life expectancy along the border, M. Smith on the obstacles school districts face in laying off teachers and yours truly talks gambling and the Rainy Day Fund with state Rep. Jim Pitts: The best of our best from January 17 to 21, 2011.

Texas Gubernatorial Term Lengths: 1846-2011
Texas Gubernatorial Term Lengths: 1846-2011

Perry's Term Thrice as Long as Average Texas Govs'

Most people know that Gov. Rick Perry, inaugurated to a third term Tuesday, has served longer than any other chief executive in Texas history. What's remarkable, though, is just how much longer than the state's previous governors — even those who've served during the modern era.