Tribpedia: Rick Perry

Tribpedia

James Richard "Rick" Perry, the longest-serving governor in Texas history, was sworn in as the state's 47th chief executive on Dec. 21, 2000, replacing then-Gov. George W. Bush upon his ascendancy to the White House. Perry was elected to a four-year term in 2002 and re-elected in 2006 and 2010. On July 8, 2013, Perry announced he would not ...

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Bush, Perry Tension Renewed as Governor's Star Rises

To the list of things that Rick Perry shows contempt for — Barack Obama’s leadership abilities, excessive federal regulation, coyotes that interrupt his morning jog — add this surprising one: George W. Bush’s ideological disposition. The governor seems to go out of his way to criticize his predecessor as insufficiently conservative. Bush, for his part, makes no mention of Perry in his memoir. "There's certainly no love lost between these two men," says UT presidential scholar Bruce Buchanan.

Two Factions in the State's Majority Party

Now that the Republicans have a huge majority in the Texas House, they aren't sharing power with the Democrats; they're sharing power with themselves. More precisely, one faction of Republicans is sharing power with another faction of Republicans. However you label it — moderate vs. conservative, country club vs. country, Bush vs. Perry — it's bumpy.

The waiting room at People's Community Clinic in Austin, TX in November 2010.
The waiting room at People's Community Clinic in Austin, TX in November 2010.

Can Texas and a Dozen Other States Drop Medicaid?

A week after newly emboldened Republicans in the Texas Legislature floated a radical cost-saving proposal — withdrawing from the federal Medicaid program — health care experts, economists and think tanks are trying to determine just how possible it would be. The answer? It’s complicated. But it’s not stopping nearly a dozen other states, frantic over budget shortfalls and anticipating new costs from federal health care reform, from exploring something that was, until recently, unthinkable.

After Monitor Departs, A Teenager Is Killed

The same Houston-area residential treatment center where staffers forced disabled girls to fight each other — prompting child welfare officials to halt admissions and hire a safety monitor — is now under fire for the asphyxiation of a 16-year-old boy who died Friday after a restraint was applied by a staffer in a closet.

A Conversation With Mark McKinnon and Mike Baselice

For the 15th event in our TribLive series, I interviewed the former George W. Bush and John McCain media strategist and Rick Perry's pollster about what happened Tuesday night: how the Republicans took back the majority in the U.S. House and upped their number of seats in the Texas House by 30 percent, what that portends for the next two years in Austin and Washington, D.C., and whether the governor is really running for president.

Rick Perry Election Night Victory Speech

Gov. Rick Perry addresses hundreds of supporters in Buda after voters re-elected him to an unprecedented third full term in office. Hitting on a familiar theme, Perry said Texans were "tired of big government" and "fed up" with Washington's intrusion into their daily lives.
The press risers set up for Gov. Rick Perry and other Republicans' on election night, November 2, 2010.
The press risers set up for Gov. Rick Perry and other Republicans' on election night, November 2, 2010.

Rick Perry Hints at Future Races

As Gov. Rick Perry won another four years in office last night and his Democratic challenger, Bill White, conceded defeat, both men hinted at what they might do next. Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune reports.

Yes, the GOP Wave Turned Out to Be a Tsunami

Rick Perry won his third full term as governor of Texas on Tuesday, defeating former Houston Mayor Bill White by a convincing double-digit margin and positioning himself for a role on the national stage. And he led a Republican army that swept all statewide offices for the fourth election in a row, took out three Democratic U.S. congressmen and was on its way to a nearly two-thirds majority in the Texas House — a mark the GOP hasn't seen since the days following the Civil War.

A voter casts a ballot in Travis County on November 2, 2010.
A voter casts a ballot in Travis County on November 2, 2010.

Election Night 2010: The Liveblog

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The Tribune's crack reporting staff — in Houston, Buda and other political hotspots — will be posting the latest news and spin the minute the polls close. Check back and refresh often for updates and photos from the field.

White and Perry Make Their Closing Arguments

On the final weekend of the gubernatorial campaign, Gov. Rick Perry was in Midland — exactly where he was on the final weekend of the Republican primary — pushing the same anti-Washington message that has kept him comfortably ahead in the polls for most of 2010. "Make no mistake," he told the assembled crowd, "this is a national election." His Democratic challenger, Bill White, was in a leafy Houston neighborhood, knocking on doors, energizing volunteers and insisting that the pundits and promulgators of conventional wisdom are dead wrong. "We have broad support," White insisted. "We are in a position to win this race."

Insiders Say Who They Want, Expect to Win

For the first installment of our non-scientific survey of political and policy insiders on issues of the moment, we asked two questions: "Which candidate do you think will win the race for governor?" and "Who are you voting for?" We also gave them a chance to explain — and, boy, did they.

Things We're Thinking About Beyond Election Day

Yes, yes, the governor’s race: It’s tended to suck all the air out of the room this election cycle, hasn’t it? But there’s an undercard as well, and even if it’s received scant attention by comparison, don’t think it doesn’t matter. To the contrary, the outcome of races other than the one at the top of the ballot has serious implications for a great many matters of politics and policy that will affect and should interest every single Texan in the near term.

Prolific Donor Has Given $66 Million Since 2000

Over the last decade, two Republicans with the last name Perry have dominated the Texas political landscape. One is Rick, the state’s longest-serving governor. The other is Bob (no relation), the state’s largest individual political donor during that time — with no close second. Since 2000, the wealthy Houston home builder has contributed about $28 million to more than 400 candidates and political action committees in Texas, according to an analysis of campaign-finance data by The Texas Tribune. During that time, he's also contributed at least $38 million more to candidates and groups outside of Texas.