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The school finance trial involving more than two-thirds of Texas school districts and most of its charter schools kicked off Oct. 22. It is the sixth time in the last 40 years that Texas has had to address how it funds public schools — but there are new players in the courtroom this time, including a recently formed organization representing business interests and school choice advocates.

To keep track of what is sure to be the lawsuit's lengthy journey through the court system, we've collected all of our coverage, from the battles of the last legislative session to the latest developments in the case.

Here, you'll find links to the latest updates from The Texas Tribune and other news outlets, as well as our extensive guides to the state's school finance system and the legal arguments from all six parties in the case.

Time Dwindling, Another Lost Chance at School Finance

Sen. Florence Shapiro (l), R-Plano, discusses a matter with Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst on May 5, 2011 one day after the Senate passed HB1 the state budget.
Sen. Florence Shapiro (l), R-Plano, discusses a matter with Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst on May 5, 2011 one day after the Senate passed HB1 the state budget.

The death of a key education fiscal matters bill on the House floor tonight ensures that any changes to school finance formulas will happen in a conference committee — and adds fuel to speculation of a special session this summer.

What if Texas Doesn't Pass a School Finance Bill?

With little more than two weeks left of the 82nd legislative session, a growing chorus of voices is asking: What happens if lawmakers can’t agree on school finance reform? For many across the education community, it may be that limping along under the current system until the next legislative session is preferable to the deep funding cuts and permanent policy changes that a new bill would bring.

Annotated Documents: Texas Superintendent Contracts

As Texas schools brace for what could be as much as an $8 billion gap in state funding, some in the Legislature are questioning what school districts spend on administration — and in particular, on their superintendents. We’ve annotated the contracts of the ten highest paid superintendents, along with those that lead the state’s ten largest districts, so readers can view their pay in the context of retirement benefits, performance incentives and perks.

A Texas-Sized Budget Problem Deferred — to Now

Carol Strayhorn announces for governor, June, 2005.
Carol Strayhorn announces for governor, June, 2005.

The 2006 tax swap — lowering local school property taxes and creating a new state business tax to make up the difference — is at the center of the state’s current budget troubles. It was never an even swap, and the architects are still pointing fingers over what and whom to blame for the “structural deficit” in state finances.