TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 12/16/13

With various levels of government in two countries making decisions that affect the Rio Grande, the 1,900-mile river has become the subject of interstate and international legal battles that have intensified during the continuing drought.

U.S. Rep. Steve Stockman, R-Friendswood, is hoping to make a donation by the late Bob Perry an issue in his challenge of U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas.

Gov. Rick Perry has issued at least 221 pardon proclamations since taking office in December 2000. Use this database to search those declarations.

The conclusion of the House Select Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations' investigation of University of Texas System Regent Wallace Hall is on the horizon, if not imminent. UT-Austin President Bill Powers told that panel that persistent controversy, largely stemming from the actions of a regent, has taken a toll on the reputation of the university.

During a recent tug-of-war with Texas A&M Chancellor John Sharp over the interim presidency at A&M's flagship school, Gov. Rick Perry floated the idea of a new advisor to regents "on par with [the] chancellor."

 

A report analyzing Texas electricity prices finds that there are lingering problems in the state's decade-old competitive electricity market.

Organizations charged with hiring "navigators" to help the uninsured buy coverage in the federal marketplace have come under intense scrutiny, particularly in North Texas, over allegations of poor oversight and misdeeds. 

By the time Ted Cruz completes his first year in office, he will arguably have become the most recognizable face of the GOP’s far right. So what does he have to say for himself? In a wide-ranging interview, he sized up year one.  

Unlike the rest of the state, the Texas Gulf Coast has been working for decades to reduce dependency on groundwater because pumping has caused the land to sink

When schools turn to private entities for management, the arrangement can raise questions about how best to ensure financial accountability

In Texas, where nearly a third of all residents speak Spanish, Spanish-speaking candidates looking to win in 2014 have a political advantage with the coveted Hispanic vote regardless of political affiliation, according to political observers.

 

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