In Ads, Perry Reaches Out to California Businesses

Texas Governor Rick Perry (c) and wife Anita Perry (r) greet California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger at the Governor's Mansion on August 24, 2006.
Texas Governor Rick Perry (c) and wife Anita Perry (r) greet California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger at the Governor's Mansion on August 24, 2006.

Gov. Rick Perry announced Monday that he's hitting the airwaves in California to tout business opportunities in Texas and invite Californians to migrate.

"Building a business is tough, but I hear building a business in California is next to impossible," Perry says in the ad, which is posted at the website Texas Wide Open for Business, set up by the Texas Economic Development Division in the governor's office.

"Zero state income tax, low overall tax burden, sensible regulations and a fair legal system are just the things Texas offers to get your business moving," he adds. "So come to Texas — where business moves." He specifically mentions California's recently passed Proposition 30, a sales and income tax increase initiative.

The ad is 30 seconds long and will run over a week on six radio stations in the San Francisco, Sacramento, Los Angeles, Inland Empire and San Diego media markets, according to the governor's office. The ads are paid for by TexasOne, which has paid for some of Perry's trips overseas to promote Texas as a place for businesses to move.

With the ad, Perry joins others making headlines recently in touting Texas as a destination for businesses and those seeking lower taxes. Sen. Ted Cruz sent a letter to gun and bank CEOs slamming Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, the former chief of staff for President Obama. The mayor had asked Bank of America and TD Bank to reconsider their relationship with gun manufacturers. "In light of the reception you have received in the Windy City," Cruz wrote, "please know that Texas would certainly welcome more of your business and the jobs you create."

Last month, Attorney General Greg Abbott used campaign funds to pay for ads aimed at New Yorkers. “Wanted: Law abiding New York gun owns looking for lower taxes and greater opportunity," read one of the ads, which appeared on several media websites, including The New York Times.

 

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