TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 10/22/12

International observers set to visit Texas to monitor elections next month have the attention of Attorney General Greg Abbott, who warned that observers can't interfere with Texas elections.

The newly opened stretch of State Highway 130 from Austin to Seguin has an 85 mph speed limit, the fastest in the country. Beyond the debate over whether it's safe, what's it like to drive?

Wholesale electricity prices on the Texas power grid will be allowed to go twice as high as is currently possible, following a vote Thursday by the Texas Public Utility Commission. What this move means for Texans' electric bills is unclear.

According to preliminary data gathered by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the total number of students attending college this fall increased by just 12,000 over the previous year.

As Election Day nears, editorial boards at newspapers across Texas have begun endorsing candidates. Here's a list of official endorsements in particularly competitive or noteworthy races. We'll update the list as endorsements come in.

In the first installment of a three-part series on Texas Republicans' lock on state government over the past decade, Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune looks at the early days of the GOP's domination.

When Ken Armbrister, chief legislative aide to Gov. Rick Perry, said last week that Perry had told him he was going to run for re-election in 2014, Armbrister may have done his boss a favor.

A district judge issued a temporary restraining order allowing Planned Parenthood to stay in the Women's Health Program, for now.

The Texas Democratic Party in Lubbock County has released a video showing several young men in an altercation with one of its volunteers and yelling racially derogatory remarks at the volunteer, who was looking out for vandals targeting signs for President Obama.

After school district lawyers attacked Texas for underfunding public schools, an attorney for the state shot back, saying that decisions made at the local level — not the state — were to blame for school districts’ failures.


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