TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 5/28/12

Now that the ballots are counted, check out vote totals and election outcomes for candidates statewide with our complete primary election scoreboard. And throughout primary night, Tribune reporters updated you on the results of key primary battles.

Candidates who couldn’t break the 50 percent threshold Tuesday have more campaigning to do to get to the general election. Victory in the July 31 runoff can depend on the size of the race and the money that a candidate has statewide, from the first early voting totals through the last ballots counted.

Like it did in Indiana in the defeat of Sen. Dick Lugar, the Club for Growth plans to raise millions to boost former Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz in his runoff against Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst. 

Tuesday night was a wash for candidates hoping to capitalize on a backlash against the 2011 Legislature's deep budget cuts to public schools. Some won and some lost, and there wasn't a definite guiding narrative as to why.

Primary night always provides some surprises, particularly when the election is later than usual. But some races caught even the best predictors off-guard. Here’s a look at the races where some pundits and pollsters got fooled.

 

A 135-page report by a Massachusetts-based consulting group is the latest analysis suggesting that the Texas electric grid does not have adequate reserves for future years.

Nearly 100 local government entities in Texas have online access to a database with Texans’ employment information. This interactive shows which entities access the database — and how often.

Reversing its decade-long objection to testing that death row inmate Hank Skinner says could prove his innocence, the Texas Attorney General's office on Friday filed an advisory with the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals seeking to test DNA in the case.

Conventional wisdom is that candidates with Hispanic surnames have a hard time winning statewide Republican primaries, but that appears to be fading. The problem now is down the ballot, where they're trying to get re-elected.

In Part 3 of our Fertile Ground series, The Texas Tribune takes a historical look at the role of government in family planning — a long-standing women's health initiative that has become entangled in the battle over abortion.

 

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