TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 9/19/11

In second place in most GOP presidential polls, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is not taking his foot off the gas, slamming front-runner Rick Perry almost daily on the Texas governor's past statements on Social Security.

In a speech to the Faith and Freedom Coalition in Orlando, hours before his third presidential debate, Perry said the most frequent target of his political attacks needed a little divine intervention to guide him in the White House.

Nationwide, about 60,000 concussions occur on high school fields every year. The Tribune visited Wimberley High School to find out how it is preparing for new state laws to prevent head injuries in student athletes.

General elections in Texas will be less competitive than ever under the redistricting maps approved by the Legislature earlier this year. The political threats to incumbents, if any, will come in primaries and not in general elections.

With his opponents still taking aim at his comments on Social Security, Perry on Thursday will go into his third debate with an opportunity to defend a strategy that could pit young voters against old ones.

 

The Texas A&M University Police Department has released its report regarding the termination of A&M System Deputy Chancellor Jay Kimbrough, who displayed a knife while he was being fired.

How much Texas pays exonerated prisoners depends largely on when they were released and applied for compensation. Changes in the law over the last decade have created vastly different payouts for former prisoners, leaving some feeling doubly wronged.

Katharine Hayhoe, the Texas Tech climate scientist and author of A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions, on why why working in Texas, a state full of both prominent climate skeptics and extreme weather, is an "opportunity."

President Obama faces a conundrum: On immigration he's attacked from the left and the right, by disillusioned Latino critics and by conservatives who accuse him of failing to secure the country's borders — even as he deports a record number of immigrants.

Perry calls Social Security a “Ponzi scheme” and says people ought to control their own retirement money. But if the social safety net created in 1935 were eliminated what might take its place? In Galveston, a possible answer.

 

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