Outside Cash Funding Texas Congressional Races

Congressional Fundraising By Zip Code Prefix: 1st Quarter 2011
Congressional Fundraising By Zip Code Prefix: 1st Quarter 2011

As we noted earlier this month, candidates in next year’s U.S. House and Senate elections in Texas raised more than $5 million in the first three months of 2011 to spend on advertising, staff and other campaign items.

Most of the money raised from individual donors — not political action committees — was raised from Texans. But a significant portion came from outside the Lone Star State, according to detailed filings released by the Federal Election Commission.

More than $700,000 — or one in seven of the dollars raised from individual donors — came from donors living in other states, largely on the East and West Coasts, the data show. Donors in California led the way, giving about $170,000, followed by those in Virginia, Washington, D.C. and New York.

This national map above uses graduated symbols to display total fundraising by ZIP code prefixes, a grouping of contiguous geography based on the first-three digits of each code. Note the clusters of symbols in large population and power centers elsewhere.

The Texas map shows what one might expect: Donations from come from the urban areas, which also have more of the type of wealthy professionals — business people, lawyers, etc. — who fund political campaigns. Donors from prefix 752xx (Dallas) sent the most money, about $1.2 million, followed by the central areas of Houston ($520,000), San Antonio ($415,000) and Fort Worth ($395,000): 

Here are the top Texas prefix totals in table form:

ZIP AreaStatePopulationTotalArea
752 TX 1,359,291 $1,222,311 Dallas
770 TX 2,992,276 $528,518 Houston
782 TX 1,565,486 $415,248 San Antonio
761 TX 915,097 $395,884 Fort Worth
787 TX 982,765 $367,325 Austin
750 TX 2,118,393 $229,025 Dallas Suburbs
797 TX 378,670 $208,918 Midland
760 TX 1,174,259 $204,490 Fort Worth
757 TX 338,975 $82,650 Tyler
774 TX 984,844 $70,100 Katy
791 TX 221,169 $63,720 Amarillo
756 TX 329,338 $60,750 Longview
773 TX 1,063,878 $54,550 North Houston
794 TX 245,891 $52,950 Lubbock
784 TX 293,689 $47,550 Corpus Christi
778 TX 284,714 $37,126 Bryan
780 TX 534,053 $34,596 Laredo
751 TX 752,198 $30,075 Dallas
786 TX 856,727 $29,800 Austin

And the top 20 national prefixes:

ZIP AreaStatePopulationTotalArea
200 DC 600,670 $100,340 Metro Washington
100 NY 1,569,601 $44,800 New York City
221 VA 424,553 $31,150 Northern Virginia
941 CA 815,035 $26,350 San Franscico
220 VA 462,345 $25,750 Northern Virginia
222 VA 216,305 $24,944 Arlington
939 CA 397,484 $22,500 Salinas
223 VA 321,017 $20,050 Alexandria
926 CA 1,297,494 $19,000 Santa Ana
303 GA 1,049,667 $18,500 Atlanta
949 CA 383,354 $17,800 North Bay
208 MD 667,409 $16,738 Suburban D.C.
040 ME 343,457 $15,000 Portland
802 CO 1,013,896 $13,500 Denver
931 CA 188,175 $11,000 Santa Barbara
945 CA 2,281,691 $11,000 Oakland
600 IL 1,679,341 $10,250 Palatine
102 NY 7,356 $10,000 Staten Island
341 FL 386,673 $9,800 Fort Myers
553 MN 967,377 $9,600 Minneapolis

Of course, such fundraising practices are perfectly legal, and not unexpected, but they are still worth highlighting. Let us know if you have feedback or ideas for other data-related content, and be sure to follow @TribData on Twitter for updates.

Some notes about the data: The fundraising totals only reflect individual donations, not other types of campaign reciepts, such as loans or interest on investments with campaign funds. Also, candidates aren't required to itemize contributions from people who give less than $200.

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