Tribpedia: Texas Supreme Court

The Texas Supreme Court is the highest appellate court for civil litigation in Texas. Located in Austin, the panel consists of a chief justice and eight justices who are elected statewide to staggered six-year terms. The governor also has the authority to appoint justices temporarily to fill vacancies. Appointed justices, who must be confirmed by the Texas Senate, may serve ...

Don R. Willett, Justice on the Supreme Court of Texas. He was appointed by Governor Rick Perry on August 24, 2005.
Don R. Willett, Justice on the Supreme Court of Texas. He was appointed by Governor Rick Perry on August 24, 2005.

Analysis: Texas Judge Tweets While Trump Auditions for GOP

You already knew about Donald Trump’s reverence for Twitter, but it’s still surprising that a Texas judge known mainly for his funny tweets would land on the Republican presidential candidate’s list of possible U.S. Supreme Court nominees.

This flue gas scrubber, installed at a Valero refinery in Houston in 2006, reduces emissions of nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide and particulate matter.
This flue gas scrubber, installed at a Valero refinery in Houston in 2006, reduces emissions of nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide and particulate matter.

Texas Court: Houston Overstepped with Air Pollution Rules

In a victory for a coalition of large industrial facilities, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday that the city of Houston illegally subverted state law by passing two ordinances designed to regulate air pollution. 

Who's a good boy? Monte Carlo is a good boy, and also the property of his owners in the eyes of the law, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday.
Who's a good boy? Monte Carlo is a good boy, and also the property of his owners in the eyes of the law, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday.

Texas Supreme Court Rules on Who Owns Dog

The dog days are over for a Houston family who successfully affirmed their ownership rights over a German Shepherd after a three-year legal battle that ended up at the Texas Supreme Court.

Left to right, top to bottom: Paul Green, Rick Green, Eva Guzman, Debra Lehrmann, Michael Massengale, and Joe Pool.
Left to right, top to bottom: Paul Green, Rick Green, Eva Guzman, Debra Lehrmann, Michael Massengale, and Joe Pool.

Three Supreme Court Justices Face Challenges

In all three state Supreme Court seats up for election this year, Republican incumbents face primary challengers on March 1 – but that's where the similarities end. 

An oil driller had filed a lawsuit over sales tax refunds. Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar's office warned that a Texas loss could have spurred up to $4.4 billion in refund filings for 2017 alone.
An oil driller had filed a lawsuit over sales tax refunds. Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar's office warned that a Texas loss could have spurred up to $4.4 billion in refund filings for 2017 alone.

Oil Driller's Lawsuit Could Cost Texas Billions in Tax Refunds

What is the definition of "tangible personal property?" The arcane question is at the center of a lawsuit that could reap energy companies a multibillion-dollar windfall and drain the state's budget surplus.

Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Nathan Hecht
Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Nathan Hecht

Commission Will Address Texas "Justice Gap"

A large number of Texans — mostly middle class — fall into a "justice gap" where they aren't poor enough to receive free legal aid provided to indigents but can't afford basic legal services on their own. 

Former Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court Wallace Jefferson speaks with a group of people after oral arguments before the Texas Supreme Court. Jefferson argued on behalf of six plaintiffs who were charged with court fees during divorce proceedings even though all six had filed "pauper petitions."
Former Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court Wallace Jefferson speaks with a group of people after oral arguments before the Texas Supreme Court. Jefferson argued on behalf of six plaintiffs who were charged with court fees during divorce proceedings even though all six had filed "pauper petitions."

Tarrant County Defends Right to Charge Poor Petitioners

The Texas Supreme Court scrutinized the legality of court costs imposed on indigent plaintiffs — in this case, fees the Tarrant County clerk’s office charged six poor plaintiffs pursuing divorces — during oral arguments on Wednesday.

 

Texas Supreme Court justices listen to the State of the Judiciary speech on February 23, 2011.
Texas Supreme Court justices listen to the State of the Judiciary speech on February 23, 2011.

Indigent Court Fee Case Goes Before Supreme Court

When and how local clerks can make poor plaintiffs pay court fees to get divorced will be argued before the Texas Supreme Court Wednesday, with both sides hoping the justices provide clarity on the contentious issue.  

Texas Solicitor General Scott Keller addresses the state Supreme Court Sept. 1, 2015 during oral arguments in the latest school finance case. The state's highest civil court agreed to hear the state's appeal of a 2014 lower court ruling that struck down the state's method of funding public schools as unconstitutional. (AP/Eric Gay)
Texas Solicitor General Scott Keller addresses the state Supreme Court Sept. 1, 2015 during oral arguments in the latest school finance case. The state's highest civil court agreed to hear the state's appeal of a 2014 lower court ruling that struck down the state's method of funding public schools as unconstitutional. (AP/Eric Gay)

State Asks Supreme Court to Drop School Finance Lawsuit

“Money isn’t pixie dust” when it comes to improving public schools, lawyers for the state of Texas told the state Supreme Court on Tuesday, arguing an appeal in what has been described as the most far-reaching school finance case in state history. 

 

The Texas Supreme Court convenes in the House chamber for a special ceremony on November 11, 2013.
The Texas Supreme Court convenes in the House chamber for a special ceremony on November 11, 2013.

Analysis: Education Funding With a Judicial Assist

The Texas Supreme Court is about to hear the latest challenge to the state's financing of public schools. Maybe they'll throw it out, but history says otherwise: This almost always means changes in school policy and increases in taxes.