Tribpedia: Texas House of Representatives

The Texas House of Representatives is one arm of the the Texas Legislature, the other being the Texas Senate. It is considered the "lower" chamber, with 150 members who represent districts of 150,000 people each. The primary legislative power is enacting laws, and the most visible function of the Legislature is to make public policy through drafting, considering and ...

State Rep. Ruth McClendon Submits Letter of Resignation

Sen. Rodney Ellis and State Rep. Ruth Jones McClendon, D-San Antonio, celebrate Gov. Abbott's signing of HB48 that establishes the Timothy Cole Exoneration Review Commission. In background is Cole's brother, Cory Session.
Sen. Rodney Ellis and State Rep. Ruth Jones McClendon, D-San Antonio, celebrate Gov. Abbott's signing of HB48 that establishes the Timothy Cole Exoneration Review Commission. In background is Cole's brother, Cory Session.

State Rep. Ruth McClendon, D-San Antonio, has submitted a letter of resignation to Gov. Greg Abbotteffective Jan 31, the governor's office confirmed Tuesday.

Clockwise, from top left: Republican state Reps. Tony Tinderholt of Arlington, John Frullo of Lubbock, Byron Cook of Corsicana and Matt Rinaldi of Irving.
Clockwise, from top left: Republican state Reps. Tony Tinderholt of Arlington, John Frullo of Lubbock, Byron Cook of Corsicana and Matt Rinaldi of Irving.

Analysis: The Future of the Texas House Could Be Seen in Eight Races

Will bragging rights in the Republican primaries for Texas House seats go to the management now in place or to those opposed to the current leaders? Watching these races involving incumbents will provide some answers.

State Rep. Jonathan Stickland, R-Bedford, is shown during a legislative debate on gun legislation on April 17, 2015.
State Rep. Jonathan Stickland, R-Bedford, is shown during a legislative debate on gun legislation on April 17, 2015.

Analysis: For Politicians, There's No Statute of Limitations on Comments

All of us have to watch our mouths — particularly politicians. State Rep. Jonathan Stickland is under political fire for past online comments. He's apologized, but time is the enemy here for the Bedford Republican, who's facing a primary challenge.

The 2015 Texas Tribune Festival's keynote sessions included one-on-one conversations with Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (clockwise, from top left), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, U.S. House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Texas House Speaker Joe Straus. There was also a panel discussion on the 2016 presidential race.
The 2015 Texas Tribune Festival's keynote sessions included one-on-one conversations with Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (clockwise, from top left), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, U.S. House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Texas House Speaker Joe Straus. There was also a panel discussion on the 2016 presidential race.

2015 Tribune Festival: Videos of the Keynote Sessions

During the keynote sessions of the 2015 Texas Tribune Festival, we featured one-on-one conversations with Dan Patrick, Joe Straus, Nancy Pelosi and Julián Castro. You can watch those interviews and videos of our other keynote sessions here.

State Rep. Byron Cook, R-Corsicana, debates an amendment to SB19, an ethics bill on May 26, 2015.
State Rep. Byron Cook, R-Corsicana, debates an amendment to SB19, an ethics bill on May 26, 2015.

Analysis: Patrick Makes An Old Bill Come Due

Legislation that would have blocked public employees from paying union or association dues with paycheck deductions failed last session. But the Senate is reopening the issue, and it could play against a powerful House chairman up for reelection next year.

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus listened to a Jan. 13, 2015, speech by a fellow member nominating him for another term as speaker.
Texas House Speaker Joe Straus listened to a Jan. 13, 2015, speech by a fellow member nominating him for another term as speaker.

Analysis: Winning by Packing the Ballot

It should come as no surprise when political plotters and schemers try to pack a primary election to force an incumbent into a runoff. Their hope is that the runoff's greater concentration of partisan voters will be harder on the incumbents.