Tribpedia: Texas House of Representatives

The Texas House of Representatives is one arm of the the Texas Legislature, the other being the Texas Senate. It is considered the "lower" chamber, with 150 members who represent districts of 150,000 people each. The primary legislative power is enacting laws, and the most visible function of the Legislature is to make public policy through drafting, considering and ...

Texplainer: When Legislators Die or Resign, What Happens to Their Seats?

The March 1 primary ballot will feature 18 open seats in the Texas Legislature – two in the Senate and 16 in the House.
The March 1 primary ballot will feature 18 open seats in the Texas Legislature – two in the Senate and 16 in the House.

When a legislator dies or resigns, their seat is filled through a special election. The governor sets the date for this election, usually in May or November. The new representative serves out the end of the old representative's term. Constituents in the meantime can typically voice concerns to a skeleton crew of staff members.

Governor Rick Perry, Speaker Joe Straus and Lt. Governor David Dewhurst after their first weekly breakfast meeting saying they will work together on the state budget.
Governor Rick Perry, Speaker Joe Straus and Lt. Governor David Dewhurst after their first weekly breakfast meeting saying they will work together on the state budget.

Current Differences Hint at Possible Friction in '13

Usually, the political establishment is more or less united, with major trade groups and major officeholders sticking with incumbents and, more importantly, sticking with one another. Not this year. 

Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signs Senate Bill 18, a piece of eminent domain legislation, on May 23, 2011, beside state Sen. Craig Estes, R-Wichita Falls, and Rep. Charlie Geren, R-River Oaks.
Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signs Senate Bill 18, a piece of eminent domain legislation, on May 23, 2011, beside state Sen. Craig Estes, R-Wichita Falls, and Rep. Charlie Geren, R-River Oaks.

Campaign Chatter

The endorsements just keep on rolling in... 

Mark P. Jones
Mark P. Jones

Guest Column: Republican Candidates, Side by Side

Rice University political scientist Mark P. Jones looks at the legislative voting records of candidates in a half-dozen GOP primaries, finding some significant differences in House races and negligible differences in two Senate contests.

Group Aims to Bring God Into Politics

God and Country, a new Texas-based organization, will hold a rally Saturday at a Tyler church to “draw a line in the sand and aggressively and publicly defend those certain unalienable rights endowed by our creator.”

Interactive: What's My District Now?

Pending any legal intervention, the three court-issued redistricting maps (House, Senate and Congress) and the State Board of Education map drawn up by the 82nd Legislature are now in effect. Use our interactive to see which district you live in now and who represents you.