Tribpedia: Texas House of Representatives

The Texas House of Representatives is one arm of the the Texas Legislature, the other being the Texas Senate. It is considered the "lower" chamber, with 150 members who represent districts of 150,000 people each. The primary legislative power is enacting laws, and the most visible function of the Legislature is to make public policy through drafting, considering and ...

State Sen. Joan Huffman, R-Houston, the chairwoman of the Senate State Affairs Committee, listened to testimony during a Sept. 14, 2016, committee meeting.
State Sen. Joan Huffman, R-Houston, the chairwoman of the Senate State Affairs Committee, listened to testimony during a Sept. 14, 2016, committee meeting.

At the Texas Capitol, the union dues bill is back

Legislation to stop automatic payroll deductions for most public employee unions is back after failing two years ago. Supporters say the state shouldn't be involved in collecting union dues; opponents say the GOP is trying to cripple certain unions.

Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a rally at the Capitol for school choice January 24, 2017. Both Abbott and Lt. Governor Dan Patrick spoke in favor of expanding school choice options. Students, educators, activists and parents marched on the south lawn to show their support for expanding school choice options during National School Choice Week.
Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a rally at the Capitol for school choice January 24, 2017. Both Abbott and Lt. Governor Dan Patrick spoke in favor of expanding school choice options. Students, educators, activists and parents marched on the south lawn to show their support for expanding school choice options during National School Choice Week.

Analysis: Texas leaders posturing in public for legislative advantage

Texas state leaders are debating several important issues in a very public way, delivering their messages to one another through rallies, press conferences, trade association meetings and the media. Get your popcorn ready.

Texas Secretary of State Rolando Pablo gavels in the 85 Legislature on January 10, 2017.
Texas Secretary of State Rolando Pablo gavels in the 85 Legislature on January 10, 2017.

Slideshow: 85th Texas Legislature kicks off

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The Texas Tribune's photographers were on hand at the state Capitol on Tuesday to capture scenes from the opening day of the 85th Legislative Session.

Elector Christopher Suprun, who said he will vote for Ohio Gov. John Kasich instead of Donald Trump, is sworn in at the Texas Capitol as a member of the Electoral College on December 19, 2016.
Elector Christopher Suprun, who said he will vote for Ohio Gov. John Kasich instead of Donald Trump, is sworn in at the Texas Capitol as a member of the Electoral College on December 19, 2016.

Texas electors cast 36 votes for Trump, 1 for Kasich and 1 for Ron Paul

All but two of Texas' 38 electors voted Monday to officially put Donald Trump in the White House, with one elector casting a ballot for Ohio Gov. John Kasich and another voting for a fellow Texan, former U.S. Rep. Ron Paul.

Briana Dovi, who graduated from University of Texas at Arlington, is one of the few foster youths in Texas that has taken advantage of the free tuition waiver provided by the state.
Briana Dovi, who graduated from University of Texas at Arlington, is one of the few foster youths in Texas that has taken advantage of the free tuition waiver provided by the state.

Texas foster youth struggle to get college degrees

Although Texas offers free tuition waivers and other benefits to ease foster youths' transition to higher education, the number of students using the resources has declined.

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton during their first presidential debate
at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, on Sept. 26, 2016.
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton during their first presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, on Sept. 26, 2016.

Analysis: Season of speculating on Trump effect in Texas is over

We've reached the eve of the election, with many political fortune-tellers predicting big changes in Texas. Here's a way to measure it, if it happens.

Democrat Mary Ann Perez is challenging state Rep. Gilbert Peña, R-Pasadena (top right), in House District 144; in another rematch, Democrat Philip Cortez (bottom right) is attempting to regain his seat from state Rep. Rick Galindo, R-San Antonio.
Democrat Mary Ann Perez is challenging state Rep. Gilbert Peña, R-Pasadena (top right), in House District 144; in another rematch, Democrat Philip Cortez (bottom right) is attempting to regain his seat from state Rep. Rick Galindo, R-San Antonio.

Rematches might see two Texas House districts flip

Republicans wrested away seats in Pasadena and San Antonio districts last election, and the ousted Democrats are trying to get them back.

State Sens. Brian Birdwell, R-Granbury, and Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay, listen to testimony at a Senate Committee on State Affairs hearing reviewing current ethics laws governing public officials and employees on Oct, 5, 2016.
State Sens. Brian Birdwell, R-Granbury, and Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay, listen to testimony at a Senate Committee on State Affairs hearing reviewing current ethics laws governing public officials and employees on Oct, 5, 2016.

Analysis: In Texas, Lawmakers Regulate Their Own Regulators

The Texas Ethics Commission regulates legislators. Legislators control the commission's laws and budget. It's a complicated relationship.

Texas Education Agency investigator Doug Phillips testifies on punishing educators for inappropriate student-teacher relationships during a public hearing Dec. 7, 2015 before the Senate Education Committee.
Texas Education Agency investigator Doug Phillips testifies on punishing educators for inappropriate student-teacher relationships during a public hearing Dec. 7, 2015 before the Senate Education Committee.

Help Wanted to Investigate Student-Teacher Relationships

Faced with growing state attention on improper student-teacher relationships, the Texas Education Agency is asking lawmakers for hundreds of thousands of additional dollars to help investigate them — plus new legislation.