Tribpedia: Phil King

Houston attorney Tony Buzbee, who leads Gov. Rick Perry's legal team, explains the felony indictments on August 18, 2014.
Houston attorney Tony Buzbee, who leads Gov. Rick Perry's legal team, explains the felony indictments on August 18, 2014.

The Brief: Sept. 24, 2014

The special prosecutor overseeing the criminal case against Gov. Rick Perry let his frustration be known on a request by Perry's attorneys to excuse him from appearing at an Oct. 13 pre-trial hearing.

The Rolling V Ranch in Wise County, Texas is home to power transmission lines built by Oncor. The owner, Johnny Vinson says one stretch of the new lines are not built where Oncor promised to build them.
The Rolling V Ranch in Wise County, Texas is home to power transmission lines built by Oncor. The owner, Johnny Vinson says one stretch of the new lines are not built where Oncor promised to build them.

Landowners, Utilities Keep Eye on Rancher's Bid to Move Power Line

UPDATED: The Texas Public Utility Commission on Friday heard oral arguments in the case of a Wise County rancher protesting a power line that he says was built in the wrong place on his property. The commission is poised to vote on the line’s fate on May 30.

 

 

 

Texas Railroad Commission lead engineering technician for districts 1 and 2, Michael Polasek, inspects a salt water disposal injection well at a Heckman Water Resources commercial disposal facility on the LAMZA lease near Highway 80, January 22, 2012.
Texas Railroad Commission lead engineering technician for districts 1 and 2, Michael Polasek, inspects a salt water disposal injection well at a Heckman Water Resources commercial disposal facility on the LAMZA lease near Highway 80, January 22, 2012.

Mayors: State Must Act Faster on Earthquake Study

More than six months after a series of earthquakes surprised parts of North Texas, the mayors of two shaken-up towns told a state House subcommittee Monday that the state has moved too slowly in investigating what’s behind the phenomenon.

 

Speaker's Race, Anyone?

Nobody's openly campaigning right now, but there's talk of who might succeed Joe Straus if he stumbles before January. Attribute the speculation to inertia: The House's top job was in play for at least four years before Straus won it 17 months ago, and members and the lobby and the press and other gawkers have been trained to study every new complaint, slight, reward and compliment for signs of a coup. While he appears to be on solid ground going into his second session behind the podium, don't erase the possibility of a contest. It's an uncertain environment: It's an election year, Straus is green and the Capitol is full of people who are constantly looking for a better deal than the one they've got.

And They're Off!

It's time to harvest the political speculations of the last several months: Democrats and Republicans have until January 4 to put their names on the ballots, or not, in anticipation of the March 2 primaries.