Tribpedia: Federal Health Reform And Texas

When the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Senate version of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law on March 21, 2010, the reaction from Texas leaders of all political persuasions was swift, varied and impassioned — no surprise, given the sweeping scope of the new law.

One thing all sides could agree on: The implications ...

Democrats Argue Proposed Navigator Rules Politically Motivated

Democrats pushed the Texas Department of Insurance to justify proposed state rules on the federal navigator program at a hearing on Monday. They said the rules were politically motivated, and created excessive and unnecessary training requirements and registration fees that would impede navigators’ ability to help consumers gain health insurance coverage

Kenneth Flippin, left, and Jane Denson, right, of Enroll America at the home of Shelby Childress.
Kenneth Flippin, left, and Jane Denson, right, of Enroll America at the home of Shelby Childress.

In North Texas, ACA Navigators Under Fire

Organizations charged with hiring "navigators" to help the uninsured buy coverage in the federal marketplace have come under intense scrutiny, particularly in North Texas, over allegations of poor oversight and misdeeds.

 

Yesenia Alvarado holds her daughter, Medicaid patient Melanie Almaraz, 2, while waiting to see Dr. Alberto Vasquez for treatment of a fever at the Su Clinica Familiar in Harlingen, Texas on Jul. 9, 2013.
Yesenia Alvarado holds her daughter, Medicaid patient Melanie Almaraz, 2, while waiting to see Dr. Alberto Vasquez for treatment of a fever at the Su Clinica Familiar in Harlingen, Texas on Jul. 9, 2013.

State Gets Federal OK to Boost Medicaid Payments

UPDATED: A year after Texas was slated to increase Medicaid payments to primary care physicians under the Affordable Care Act, the state has received federal approval to implement the change.

 

 

Jill Ramirez, the director of outreach for the Latino Healthcare Forum, passes out flyers and explains components of the Affordable Care Act on Oct. 5, 2013.
Jill Ramirez, the director of outreach for the Latino Healthcare Forum, passes out flyers and explains components of the Affordable Care Act on Oct. 5, 2013.

Few Texans Have Found Health Coverage Through Affordable Care Act

Fewer than 3,000 Texans successfully found private health insurance during the first month of the Affordable Care Act’s open enrollment, according to federal enrollment figures released Wednesday.

Patients wait to be seen at the People's Community Clinic in Austin, on Nov. 8, 2010.
Patients wait to be seen at the People's Community Clinic in Austin, on Nov. 8, 2010.

In Texas, Groups Work to Help Latinos Get Health Coverage

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In Texas, where Latinos make up a large portion of the uninsured, the federal insurance marketplace may only be part of the solution. Grassroots groups and even Spanish-language media are stepping up help Latinos find coverage. 

Kathleen Sebelius discusses Healthcare.gov with Kat Richards and Mark Sullivan who just used the site to sign up
Kathleen Sebelius discusses Healthcare.gov with Kat Richards and Mark Sullivan who just used the site to sign up

Sebelius Faults Texas Leaders Over Efforts Targeting Obamacare

In Austin to highlight insurance enrollment efforts under the Affordable Care Act, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius acknowledged problems with the online marketplace and criticized some Texas leaders' efforts to block the law.

A patient at The People's Community Clinic pays her bill as the cashier’s desk.  The Community Health Assistance Program, a program that helps Texans get access to insurance, will run out of federal grant money in a few weeks.
A patient at The People's Community Clinic pays her bill as the cashier’s desk. The Community Health Assistance Program, a program that helps Texans get access to insurance, will run out of federal grant money in a few weeks.

Texas Prepares to Shutter High-Risk Insurance Pool

Texas' high-risk insurance pool for some of the state’s sickest residents will close at year's end, pushing participants to find coverage in the federal health insurance marketplace. Advocates are getting the word out to ensure residents don't have a lapse in coverage.