Tribpedia: Bill White

William Howard "Bill" White, born in San Antonio in 1954, is a politician and third-term mayor of Houston, the fourth most-populous city in the country. He is the Democratic nominee for Texas governor in the 2010 general election against incumbent Republican Gov. Rick Perry

A former trial lawyer, federal agency executive and businessman, White was elected as mayor in ...

Jeremy Bird speaking at The Texas Tribune Festival on Sep. 28, 2013
Jeremy Bird speaking at The Texas Tribune Festival on Sep. 28, 2013

What Went Wrong With Battleground Texas?

Battleground Texas launched nearly two years ago with the goal of turning reliably red Texas into a purple state where Democrats could compete. But after the 2014 general election, Texas looks redder than ever. So what went wrong? 

 

A Tesla Model S. The California-based electric automaker had considered Texas for its $5 billion lithium-ion battery factory. The company is also hoping to sell cars in Texas but does not have required franchise dealerships, as state law requires.
A Tesla Model S. The California-based electric automaker had considered Texas for its $5 billion lithium-ion battery factory. The company is also hoping to sell cars in Texas but does not have required franchise dealerships, as state law requires.

The Brief: March 27, 2014

Executives with the electric carmaker Tesla Motors met on Wednesday with government officials in San Antonio, according to the San Antonio Express-News, a development sure to spur further talk about Texas' odds of landing the company's $5 billion battery plant.

A tired-looking Gov. Rick Perry listens to a reporter's question at the Bastrop Civic Center during a press conference on the wildfires on September 5, 2011.
A tired-looking Gov. Rick Perry listens to a reporter's question at the Bastrop Civic Center during a press conference on the wildfires on September 5, 2011.

Rick Perry and Get-'er-Done Politics

Ray Perry’s son apparently learned a little something at home from the county commissioner. As governor, Rick Perry is at his best — and many Perry haters will grudgingly confirm this — when there’s a hurricane, a tornado, a flood or other natural disaster.

Demonstrators stand in front of the Texas Capitol on Feb. 22, 2011 to show their opposition to immigration legislation.
Demonstrators stand in front of the Texas Capitol on Feb. 22, 2011 to show their opposition to immigration legislation.

For Republicans, the Hazards of Red Meat

The growth of the state’s Hispanic population and the rise of immigration as a political issue put Texas Republicans in a tight spot — especially the ones with statewide aspirations.

House Speaker Joe Straus, Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst
House Speaker Joe Straus, Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst

Gimme Shelter

Gov. Rick Perry’s focus on sanctuary cities — cities that don't allow their police officers to enforce federal immigration laws — could offer him safe passage through the contentious immigration debate. But it will be tricky. 

Who's Next?

Kay Bailey Hutchison’s announcement that she won't run again for her U.S. Senate seat wasn't entirely unexpected, but it still has the potential to overturn the state's political apple cart. To separate the would-bes from the could-bes in a 2012 race, we’ve created a guide to certain, likely and plausible candidates — as well a few who are plausible only to us here at the Trib.

TribWeek: In Case You Missed It

Galbraith on why the Lege meets only every two years, Hu picks the year's best political moments on video, Ramsey on the personalities who mattered in 2010, Stiles on lobbyists with conflicts of interest and what the census means for redistricting, yours truly on the new Cameron Todd Willingham documentary, Grissom on cockfighting and Trillin on Sissy Farenthold: The best of our best from Dec. 23 to 27, 2010.

Face Time

2010 didn't turn out like it looked a year ago. Unexpected people showed up. The political environment bloomed red instead of blue. The Tea was strong. And big shots turned into paper tigers. Here are some of the political personalities who mattered.

Guest Column: Yes, Invest in Texas Democrats

If we ever hope to see the change we desire, we have to continue to support our candidates — even after a terrible loss. The alternative is to simply give up, and just as that was not acceptable for Republicans when they found themselves on the losing side, it’s not acceptable for us.

A TribLive Thanksgiving

From day one, the Tribune has put a premium on events as a very vibrant, dynamically interactive form of journalism: always before an audience, always open to the public, always on the record, usually free and whenever possible resulting in recorded content that could be posted on our web site for everyone to see, not just those lucky ducks who happened to be in the room. Usually these so-called TribLive events have been conversations with high elected officials or other newsmakers, and, indeed, they've occasionally made news. But more often than not they've simply been a way to engage with people in power, to hold them accountable, to ask them questions, to get to know them better. Today we present videos of 21 of those conversations — our way of saying thanks to the men and women who've done their time in the hot seat.
March 31, 2010. U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison in San Antonio, announcing she will keep her Senate seat through 2012.
March 31, 2010. U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison in San Antonio, announcing she will keep her Senate seat through 2012.

Kay Será, Será

For lower-ranking Republicans who would like to be higher-ranking and Democrats who barely remember ever having a shot at winning a statewide office, U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison's inscrutability about her future plans is getting to be a bit much.

TribWeek: In Case You Missed It

Our wall-to-wall Election Day coverage — complete results up and down the ballot and county by county, the all-hands-on-deck Trib team on the Republican tsunami, my conversation with George W. Bush's media adviser and Rick Perry's pollster about what happened on Tuesday, Stiles and Ramsey on what 194 candidates spent per vote this election cycle, Hu on how the GOP rout will affect the substance of the next legislative session, Hamilton on the Texas Democratic Trust's unhappy end, Ramshaw and Stiles profile the new arrivals at the Capitol in January, M. Smith on what's next for Chet Edwards and Ramsey and me on six matters of politics and policy we're thinking about going forward — plus Thevenot and Butrymowicz on a possible solution to the high school dropout problem: The best of our best from Nov. 1 to 5, 2010.