Tribpedia: Annise Parker

Annise Danette Parker, born 1956, is a Democratic politician and Houston's elected City Controller, a position she's held since 2004. Parker defeated lawyer Gene Locke in the Dec. 12th runoff for mayor.

Parker, who took office Jan. 4, will be among the most-prominent openly gay officials.

Previously, Parker served as an at-large member of the Houston City Council ...

Prop 1 signs posted along the Adaptive Sports and Recreation facility on West Grey in Houston, TX for the November 2015 election. 
Photo by: Shelby Knowles
Prop 1 signs posted along the Adaptive Sports and Recreation facility on West Grey in Houston, TX for the November 2015 election. Photo by: Shelby Knowles

Houston Ordinance Vote a Test for LGBT Advocates

After months of heated campaigning, Houston voters will have the final word next week on an embattled nondiscrimination ordinance, a big test for Texas gay rights activists.

Video: Big Cities, Big Challenges

Here's video of the "Big Cities, Big Challenges" panel discussion from The 2015 Texas Tribune Festival. Featured panelists were Corpus Christi Mayor Nelda Martinez, Houston Mayor Annise Parker, Austin Mayor Steve Adler and San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor.

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick hugs Sen. Kevin Eltife after he is sworn-in as President pro tempore of the Texas Senate on June 1, 2015
Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick hugs Sen. Kevin Eltife after he is sworn-in as President pro tempore of the Texas Senate on June 1, 2015

The Brief: June 3, 2015

With legislative business concluded, talk has immediately turned in some quarters to the next election season.

State Rep. Four Price, R-Amarillo and Sen Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, at the final Sunset Advisory Commission meeting on Jan. 14, 2015.
State Rep. Four Price, R-Amarillo and Sen Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, at the final Sunset Advisory Commission meeting on Jan. 14, 2015.

The Brief: March 19, 2015

Lawmakers late Wednesday afternoon signaled that they will tap the brakes on plans to consolidate the state's health and human services agencies.

A cascade aerator is shown at the Twin Oaks Valley Water Treatment Plant outside of San Antonio, where the San Antonio Water System maintains an underground storage reservoir.
A cascade aerator is shown at the Twin Oaks Valley Water Treatment Plant outside of San Antonio, where the San Antonio Water System maintains an underground storage reservoir.

The Brief: Oct. 30, 2014

Questions continue to be raised about a giant water pipeline project that would pump roughly 16 billion gallons of groundwater annually from Burleson County to San Antonio.

An exterior view of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas on Oct. 1, 2014.
An exterior view of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas on Oct. 1, 2014.

The Brief: Oct. 16, 2014

Wednesday amounted to a daylong series of body blows to those who thought that authorities had things under control in the response to the diagnosis of Ebola in Dallas.

The Brief: Dec. 18, 2013

The House select committee investigating possible articles of impeachment against UT System Regent Wallace Hall meets Wednesday. And indications are that it could be the last meeting as the investigation moves toward a conclusion.

UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa shakes hands with visitors at a Senate reception on Mar. 5, 2013.
UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa shakes hands with visitors at a Senate reception on Mar. 5, 2013.

The Brief: Dec. 12, 2013

Bill Powers' future as University of Texas at Austin president could be put to a vote at a Thursday meeting of the UT System's Board of Regents.

Current and former CPRIT Oversight Committee members testify before the House Transparency Committee on April 9, 2013.
Current and former CPRIT Oversight Committee members testify before the House Transparency Committee on April 9, 2013.

The Evening Brief: Nov. 25, 2013

Your evening reading: the changing face of Fort Bend County; fears of bigger voter ID headaches to come; noted D.C. political pundit weighs in on Wendy Davis' chances

Houston Mayor Annise Parker at the Texas Democratic Party's convention in Houston on June 8, 2012.
Houston Mayor Annise Parker at the Texas Democratic Party's convention in Houston on June 8, 2012.

The Brief: Nov. 21, 2013

Houston Mayor Annise Parker will move to extend health and life insurance benefits to same-sex legal spouses of city employees, despite a 2001 city charter amendment that was put to the voters specifically to prohibit the practice.

House Speaker Joe Straus and state Rep. Jimmie Don Aycock celebrate the passage of Proposition 6 on Nov. 5, 2013.
House Speaker Joe Straus and state Rep. Jimmie Don Aycock celebrate the passage of Proposition 6 on Nov. 5, 2013.

The Brief: Nov. 6, 2013

In the end, the only electoral drama on Prop 6 was how quickly the wire services would make the call after the polls closed in El Paso.

Houston Mayor Annise Parker at the Texas Democratic Party's convention in Houston on June 8, 2012.
Houston Mayor Annise Parker at the Texas Democratic Party's convention in Houston on June 8, 2012.

The Brief: Sept. 12, 2013

The gay rights debate that sparked a bitter fight in San Antonio this summer may soon be moving to Houston. 

Sen. Mike Jackson R-La Porte on last regular day of the 82nd legislative session May 30th, 2011
Sen. Mike Jackson R-La Porte on last regular day of the 82nd legislative session May 30th, 2011

Campaign Chatter

As expected, state Sen. Mike Jackson, R-La Porte, will run for Congress next year instead of for re-election to the Texas Senate.

He's not alone: Candidates are popping up all over the state.

Dallas Mayoral candidate David Kunkle speaks during a televised debate flanked by opponents Mike Rawlings and Ron Natinsky at Southern Methodist University on April 19 2011.
Dallas Mayoral candidate David Kunkle speaks during a televised debate flanked by opponents Mike Rawlings and Ron Natinsky at Southern Methodist University on April 19 2011.

Dallas, Fort Worth Voters Greet Mayoral Races With Yawns

It would be nice if the two largest cities in Texas’ largest metropolitan area were fired up about the June 18 runoffs that will determine their next mayors. But about the only thing voters in Dallas and Fort Worth have been engaged in is a collective yawn.

TribWeek: In Case You Missed It

M. Smith and Butrymowicz of the Hechinger Institute on charter schools and public schools making nice in the Valley, Ramsey's interview with House Speaker candidate Ken Paxton and column on the coming budget carnage, Hu on the Legislature's disappearing white Democratic women, Grissom on the sheriff who busted Willie Nelson, Hamilton talks higher ed accountability with the chair of the Governor's Business Council, Aguilar on the arrest of a cartel kingpin, Ramshaw on the explosive growth in the number of adult Texans with diabetes, Philpott on state incentive funding under fire and Galbraith on the greening of Houston: The best of our best from November 29 to December 3, 2010.

The Greening of Houston

The sprawling capital of the oil industry — the fourth-largest city in the U.S. — has embarked on a range of green initiatives in an effort to keep up with the times and, hopefully, save money. The local-food craze is the most visible of these efforts, with the opening of a weekly farmers market and the planting of Michelle Obama-style vegetable gardens tended by city hall staff. But it is also transforming itself into an electric car hub, a national leader in wind-power investment and an advocate for energy efficiency. It even has a sustainability director hired away from, yes, San Francisco.

A TribLive Thanksgiving

From day one, the Tribune has put a premium on events as a very vibrant, dynamically interactive form of journalism: always before an audience, always open to the public, always on the record, usually free and whenever possible resulting in recorded content that could be posted on our web site for everyone to see, not just those lucky ducks who happened to be in the room. Usually these so-called TribLive events have been conversations with high elected officials or other newsmakers, and, indeed, they've occasionally made news. But more often than not they've simply been a way to engage with people in power, to hold them accountable, to ask them questions, to get to know them better. Today we present videos of 21 of those conversations — our way of saying thanks to the men and women who've done their time in the hot seat.

TribWeek: In Case You Missed It

Hu on the Perry-Bush rift, Ramshaw on the adult diaper wars, Ramsey's interview with conservative budget-slasher Arlene Wohlgemuth, Galbraith on the legislature's water agenda (maybe), M. Smith on Don McLeroy's last stand (maybe), Philpott on the end of earmarks (maybe), Hamilton on the merger of the Higher Education Coordinating Board and the Texas Education Agency (maybe), Aguilar on Mexicans seeking refuge from drug violence, Grissom on inadequate health care in county jails and my conversation with Houston Mayor Annise Parker: The best of our best from November 15 to 19, 2010.

'Astrodome' stadium filled with refugees from Louisiana in Houston, Texas, USA, on September 3, 2005.
'Astrodome' stadium filled with refugees from Louisiana in Houston, Texas, USA, on September 3, 2005.

The Huddled Masses

  • 1Comment

Five years after Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana exiles have fundamentally changed Houston, and vice-versa. The uneasy arrangement was a shotgun marriage: Many evacuees had no choice in whether or where they went, and Houstonians had no choice, for humanity's sake, but to take them in.

Marketing Murderabilia

Ted Bundy’s fried hair. Sperm from college campus shooter Wayne Lo. Dirt from the crawl space where John Wayne Gacy stored 26 bodies. All are collectors’ items in the macabre world of murderabilia. The more infamous the killer, the bigger the price tag — at least for now. U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and a Houston city official are working to exterminate the industry they say allows murderers and rapists to make money from their crimes. Murderabilia peddlers insist they operate in good taste. “We don't push this into anyone's face,” says the owner of murderauction.com.

An estimated 25,000 demonstrators march past the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe in downtown Dallas.
An estimated 25,000 demonstrators march past the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe in downtown Dallas.

Is Texas a Sanctuary State?

  • 23Comments

Aides to Gov. Rick Perry's re-election campaign have accused his Democratic challenger, Bill White, the former mayor of Houston, of running a “sanctuary city," where officers don't inquire about immigration status during routine patrols and investigations. But Houston's policy is remarkably similar to that of Texas DPS under Perry. If Houston is a sanctuary city, why isn't Texas a sanctuary state?