Texas School Finance Trial

The school finance trial involving more than two-thirds of Texas school districts and most of its charter schools kicked off Oct. 22. It is the sixth time in the last 40 years that Texas has had to address how it funds public schools — but there are new players in the courtroom this time, including a recently formed organization representing business interests and school choice advocates.

To keep track of what is sure to be the lawsuit's lengthy journey through the court system, we've collected all of our coverage, from the battles of the last legislative session to the latest developments in the case.

Here, you'll find links to the latest updates from The Texas Tribune and other news outlets, as well as our extensive guides to the state's school finance system and the legal arguments from all six parties in the case.

House gives preliminary approval to bill overhauling school finance system

State Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston, chairman of the House Public Education Committee, after his bill overhauling Texas' school finance system was approved on second reading on April 19, 2017.
<p>State Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston, chairman of the House&nbsp;<span>Public Education Committee, after his bill overhauling Texas' school finance system was approved on second reading on April 19, 2017.</span></p>

In a preliminary vote, the House approved Rep. Dan Huberty's bill to inject $1.6 billion into public schools and simplify complicated funding formulas. Legislators must still take a final vote on the bill.

Watch as the Texas House debates school finance bill

The Texas House of Representatives continues the budget debate into the late afternoon Thursday on April 6, 2017.
<p><span>The Texas House of Representatives continues the budget debate into the late afternoon Thursday on April 6, 2017.</span></p>

We're livestreaming as the Texas House debates legislation aimed at boosting per-student funding for almost every school district and charter in the state.

Senate panel considers bill to simplify school finance formula

Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, challenges sponsor Sen. Larry Taylor, R-Friendswood, with a question during debate on amendments to SB 3 school choice legislation up in the Senate on March 30, 2017. &nbsp;The original bill was modified greatly during an afternoon-long debate.&nbsp;
<p>Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, challenges sponsor Sen. Larry Taylor, R-Friendswood, with a question during debate on amendments to SB 3 school choice legislation up in the Senate on March 30, 2017. &nbsp;The original bill was modified greatly during an afternoon-long debate.&nbsp;</p>

The Senate Education Committee discussed a bill that would radically simplify the state's school finance formula, stripping it of some antiquated provisions. Parents and educators who testified wanted a few new provisions added in. 

Texas made a school district take in more students. But will it help fund them?

Myritha Lenor, a senior at La Marque High School, wears her Sears badge &mdash; she works there part time &mdash;&nbsp;while studying at Texas City ISD's Challenge Academy.
<p>Myritha Lenor, a senior at La Marque High School, wears her Sears badge &mdash; she works there part time &mdash;&nbsp;while studying at Texas City ISD's Challenge Academy.</p>

As lawmakers debate possible reforms to the school finance system this week, they might decide whether to continue offering extra funds to districts like Texas City ISD, which last year was forced to annex a struggling district next to it.