Davis Digest

Texas Democrats begin to plot out strategy for 2018 midterms

Clockwise from left: former state Sen. and gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis, former Houston Mayor Annise Parker, U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-El Paso, U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-San Antonio, (r.) and his twin brother, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro.
Clockwise from left: former state Sen. and gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis, former Houston Mayor Annise Parker, U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-El Paso, U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-San Antonio, (r.) and his twin brother, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro.

A recent private meeting of some of the Democratic Party's most well-known Texas figures suggests party leaders see glimmers of hope for the midterm elections thanks to President Donald Trump.

Analysis: Donald Trump’s Trickle-Down Effect on Texas Politics

From left: Texas Agriculture Sid Miller, 2016 Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush.
From left: Texas Agriculture Sid Miller, 2016 Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush.

Donald Trump and everyone’s reaction to him might turn out to be unimportant in the next couple of election cycles. If the Republican wins the presidency, he’ll be a factor in the 2018 mid-term elections. If he doesn’t, he’ll be a memory.

Vindication For Wendy Davis and "Unruly Mob"

Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, during her filibuster of an abortion bill on June 25, 2013.
Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, during her filibuster of an abortion bill on June 25, 2013.

Almost three years to the day after Wendy Davis held the Texas Senate floor in a filibuster against abortion restrictions that galvanized reproductive rights activists, vindication came Monday in the form of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling.