Tribpedia: Transportation

Texas requires an extensive and expensive system of highways, railways and roads.

Building new roads and maintaining old ones has become increasingly costly, and efforts to keep that balance have been politically perilous.

The Trans-Texas Corridor — an attempt to pull together a master plan for the next stage of transportation building in the state — fell to political foes who objected ...

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Law Enables Drivers to Display Insurance on Phones

Motorists in Texas will soon be allowed to use their cellphones to show proof of insurance during traffic stops. Proponents of the legislation say that the law will increase at the efficiency at those stops. This story is part of our 31 Days, 31 Ways series, a monthlong look at how the bills and budget passed by the 83rd Legislature will affect Texans' lives starting Sept. 1. 

A line of Department of Public Safety troopers keeps order in the House gallery on July 9, 2013.
A line of Department of Public Safety troopers keeps order in the House gallery on July 9, 2013.

The Polling Center: From Smooth Sailing to Traffic Jam

The regular Texas legislative session was notable for bipartisan coalitions and harmony. The special sessions have been notable for partisan battles and stalemates. To understand what's going on, just look at the voters.

Route to Deal on Cash for Roads Remains Hazy

Lawmakers hoping to find a viable transportation funding measure in the third special session are looking closely at a plan that failed in the first two special sessions. But some weary legislators have expressed frustrations that Gov. Rick Perry called them back too soon and that they may fail again to find common ground.

Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst in the state Senate during the abortion debate on July 13, 2013.
Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst in the state Senate during the abortion debate on July 13, 2013.

House and Senate to Discuss TxDOT Funding Compromise

The Senate met briefly Friday to pave the way for negotiations to begin with the House over the details of a plan that would increase transportation funding by nearly $1 billion a year. The goal is for both chambers to pass the same measure next week.

A look at traffic on Interstate 30 near downtown Fort Worth in 2013.
A look at traffic on Interstate 30 near downtown Fort Worth in 2013.

Transportation Funding Likely to Be Big Issue in 2015

While abortion legislation is drawing all the attention in this second special session, lawmakers are also trying for the third time this year to find some extra money for the Texas Department of Transportation. But even if the leading proposal becomes law, funding for roads will still be a major issue in the 2015 session. 

State Sens. Robert Nichols and Joan Huffman.
State Sens. Robert Nichols and Joan Huffman.

In Abortion Fight, Other Bills Were Collateral Damage

Legislation that would create sentencing guidelines for 17-year-old murderers and increase funding for road construction were not the target of state Sen. Wendy Davis' abortion filibuster, but died amid her high-profile — and eventually successful — effort. Gov. Rick Perry has not said whether he will call a second special session to revisit those issues.