Tribpedia: Tom Delay

Tribpedia

Tom DeLay, a former Texas congressman, served Texas' 22nd Congressional District from 1984 until 2006. Nicknamed "the Hammer," he served as House majority leader from 2003 to 2005. In 2006, he resigned from Congress when he was indicted on money laundering and other charges involving campaign finance violations.

In mid-August 2010, the Justice Department ended a six-year investigation of DeLay ...

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Analysis: The Court of Public Opinion, Revisited

Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.
Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.

High-profile public figures exonerated after prosecutions for violations of state ethics and election laws paved the way for public skepticism about those kinds of cases — like one now pending against Gov. Rick Perry. The governor, like Tom DeLay and Kay Bailey Hutchison before him, contends that prosecutors are trying to make crimes of legal behavior.

Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.
Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.

Court Backs Decision Reversing DeLay's Convictions

Siding with a decision made a year ago by a lower appeals court, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals on Wednesday refused to reinstate money-laundering convictions against former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay.

 

Mugshot of Governor Rick Perry, booked on two felony counts at the Blackwell-Thurman Criminal Justice Center in Austin, Texas on Tuesday, August 19, 2014.
Mugshot of Governor Rick Perry, booked on two felony counts at the Blackwell-Thurman Criminal Justice Center in Austin, Texas on Tuesday, August 19, 2014.

The Brief: Ice Cream and a Mug Shot for Perry

Call it the frozen custard heard round the world. Gov. Rick Perry and his booking on two felony counts late Tuesday afternoon captured national attention — on social media, most of all.

Craig McDonald, the director of Texans for Public Justice, is shown at his group's Austin office on Aug. 18, 2014.
Craig McDonald, the director of Texans for Public Justice, is shown at his group's Austin office on Aug. 18, 2014.

Meet the Group That Sparked the Perry Indictment

Texans for Public Justice, the liberal-leaning group that filed the complaint that led to Gov. Rick Perry's indictment last week, has a history of messing with Texas politicians. Critics have accused Texans for Public Justice of doing Democrats' dirty work, but Director Craig McDonald said the group is solely focused on accountability and ethics. 

Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.
Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.

DeLay's Money Laundering Conviction Overturned

Former U.S. Rep. Tom DeLay’s political money laundering conviction was overturned Thursday by the state’s 3rd Court of Appeals, which said the state's evidence in the case was "legally insufficient."

Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.
Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.

A Political Defendant Faces a Political Judiciary

Texas judges run in partisan elections, and sometimes what they do as politicians gets in the way of what they're supposed to do as judges. Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, hoping to overturn his convictions in what he calls a political case, wants to toss out a judge he says is biased against him.

Jack Abramoff: The TT Interview

The former lobbyist, taking a reform tour around the country after spending almost four years in prison for his role in an influence-peddling scandal, on how to regulate lobbying in Washington, why he thinks the system is essentially corrupt, when money in politics is a problem and when it's not, and why anyone should listen to someone like him. 

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of Nov. 22, 2010

Grissom (with Tedesco of the San Antonio Express-News) on high-speed police chases on the Texas-Mexico border, Hu and Hamilton draw a roadmap through the tangle of the Speaker's Race, M. Smith on the trouble with electronic supplements to science textbooks, Ramshaw interviews patient privacy advocate Deborah Peel, Aguilar on Cuba and Texas and trade, Hamilton on the latest in biotech from Texas A&M University, Stiles on who's in the money in Congress, Hu on the controversial renewal of the state lottery contract, yours truly on Tom DeLay's victory in the face of his conviction on money-laundering charges, and E. Smith with a Thanksgiving cornucopia of TribLive videos: The best of our best from November 22 to 26, 2010.

Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.
Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.

DeLay's Conviction Doesn't Erase His Victory

Yes, a jury convicted the former U.S. House majority leader of money laundering. But his maps — the ones that upended the careers of Democrats and helped the GOP take over Congress — are still in place. No amount of jail time can change that.

Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.
Tom DeLay, shown after his trial in 2011. DeLay, who was convicted of conspiracy and money-laundering, was found innocent of all charges by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in 2014.

DeLay Jury Asks Questions About Money Laundering

The jury in the money laundering trial of former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Sugar Land, continues to deliberate — and is asking some questions of visiting District Judge Pat Priest.
Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay walks to the 331st District Court of Travis County during the August 2010 start of pre-trial hearings on corruption and money laundering charges against the former politician.
Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay walks to the 331st District Court of Travis County during the August 2010 start of pre-trial hearings on corruption and money laundering charges against the former politician.

What's at Stake in the Tom DeLay Trial?

Today, five years after Tom DeLay’s fall from power, his trial on the money laundering and conspiracy charges that forced his resignation as U.S. House majority leader is finally slated to begin. What's at stake, other than voyeuristic curiosity about whether a former congressman will go to prison?

Bill Hobby on the "Dreaded Two-Thirds Rule"

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The rules of the Texas Senate are designed to create an orderly process that respects the rights of individual members. They have lasted this long because they do the job well and consider the need for compromise in the legislative operation. Trampling the rights of the minority is never a good idea — and yet it has happened over and over again. An excerpt from the forthcoming How Things Really Work: Lessons from a Life in Politics.