Tribpedia: Texas-Mexico Border

The Texas-Mexico border makes up 1,254 miles of the 1,900-mile-long U.S.-Mexico border. 

The vast, mostly rural expanse stretches from El Paso in the West to Brownsville in the Southeast and is delineated by the Rio Grande River.

Border communities in Texas are some of the poorest regions of the state and the nation. If Texas ...

Luis CdeBaca: The TT Interview

The U.S. ambassador-at-large on why he thinks people are uneasy about admitting that human trafficking is a problem, how involved Mexican cartels are in the crime, what Texas has done to help address trafficking, and how the government can team up with the private and nonprofit sectors to draw attention to the crime.

Webb County Sheriff's Race is Rematch on the Border

In 2008, Webb County witnessed one of the most contested sheriff's races in its history, when Martin Cuellar, a former DPS lieutenant and the younger brother of Congressman Henry Cuellar, narrowly defeated incumbent Rick Flores, a fiery swashbuckler who accuses the federal government of ignoring border violence. After a brief stint as police chief in a small Arizona border town, Flores is back — trying to reclaim the seat as an independent. 

 

Nelson Balido, the president of the Border Trade Alliance (left) and President-elect, Enrique Peña Nieto
Nelson Balido, the president of the Border Trade Alliance (left) and President-elect, Enrique Peña Nieto

Analysts: Little Change Expected with New Mexico Leader

Worries about the new presidential government in Mexico are exaggerated, says San Antonio native Nelson Balido, president of the Border Trade Alliance. He recently met with Mexican President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto’s transition team in Mexico City.  

Juvenile detainees work on a new juvenile detention village in Eagle Pass. Maverick County has been taking donations for the new facility, which is being built, in part, by county employees who sacrifice their own time for the project.
Juvenile detainees work on a new juvenile detention village in Eagle Pass. Maverick County has been taking donations for the new facility, which is being built, in part, by county employees who sacrifice their own time for the project.

Detention Center Seen as Model for Reform

The chief probation officer for three counties near the Texas-Mexico border is taking a "restorative justice" approach to rehabilitating juveniles held in drug-smuggling cases. That philosophy is at the root of a new detention center that is scheduled to be completed this summer.

Voters line up to cast ballots in Mexico's presidential election Sunday at a voting sight on Popocatepetl street in Mexico City's Colonia Condesa.
Voters line up to cast ballots in Mexico's presidential election Sunday at a voting sight on Popocatepetl street in Mexico City's Colonia Condesa.

Mexico's Presidential Runner-Up Challenges Results

Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who finished second to the Institutional Revolutionary Party’s Enrique Peña Nieto in Mexico's July 1 presidential election, has announced he will officially challenge the results of the contest.

Will PRI's Return Mark Shift in U.S. Relations?

The PRI’s return to power in Mexico has prompted concerns over whether the party will cut deals with cartels to decrease drug-related violence. But the policy it will likely adopt, experts say, isn’t much different from what U.S. authorities do. The “new PRI” will also face tests in transparency and democracy.

Ballot Count Shows Peña Nieto Remains Ahead

Election officials in Mexico are moving forward with the official count of the ballots cast in Sunday’s presidential election. Early results indicate that Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or the PRI, remains ahead of his challengers.

Voters line up to cast ballots in Mexico's presidential election Sunday at a voting sight on Popocatepetl street in Mexico City's Colonia Condesa.
Voters line up to cast ballots in Mexico's presidential election Sunday at a voting sight on Popocatepetl street in Mexico City's Colonia Condesa.

Second-Place Finisher Challenges Mexico Election Result

The voting is over, but the counting may not be, after Mexico's election Sunday. Candidate Andres Manuel López Obrador, who came in second in the presidential race, said Monday evening that he would challenge the results.

PRI's Peña Nieto Projected Winner of Mexican Election

After 12 years of rule under the conservative National Action Party, Mexicans on Sunday elected Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party to lead Texas’ largest trade partner and southern neighbor. The regime change is expected to be one of the world's most monitored, as the incoming president attempts to restore peace to a country that has been plagued by drug violence.

A forensics team inspects the body of a man killed in a suspected drug-related execution along the path where he was shot on March 1, 2012 in Acapulco, Mexico.
A forensics team inspects the body of a man killed in a suspected drug-related execution along the path where he was shot on March 1, 2012 in Acapulco, Mexico.

Mexico's Election Doesn't Ease Fears About Violence

No matter who wins Sunday's presidential election in Mexico, many on both sides of the Texas-Mexico border believe that violence will continue across Mexico. More than 55,000 people have been killed in Mexico since 2006, and the nation's military is continuing its fight against drug cartels.

In Texas, Caution, Optimism Greet Mexican Election

Texas lawmakers are watching Sunday's Mexican election with great interest. Some are concerned that if the Institutional Revolutionary Party returns to power, it would revive its tainted past. Others are focused on strengthening trade between the two countries and maintaining support through the Mérida Initiative.

Mexican Firm's Bankruptcy Case Has Cross-Border Impact

A bankruptcy case pending in a Dallas courtroom has analysts waiting to see if the outcome could affect how U.S.-based companies do business in Mexico. At stake is whether or not a judge will uphold a Mexican court’s ruling that some say left U.S. bondholders on the short end of a deal with a Mexican company.

Pictured on April 7, 2012 in El Paso, Texas is Saul Reyes Salazar, a former community activist in the Juarez Valley, who was granted political asylum on January 09, 2012. Salazar has lost six family members in the drug war.
Pictured on April 7, 2012 in El Paso, Texas is Saul Reyes Salazar, a former community activist in the Juarez Valley, who was granted political asylum on January 09, 2012. Salazar has lost six family members in the drug war.

Mexicans Seeking Refuge Come Together to Speak Out

Many Mexicans displaced by the violence in Chihuahua are seeking refuge in El Paso, where through their common tragedies they have formed a group to raise awareness about their plight. “We are going to shake things up,” said Carlos Spector, a lawyer for exiles in the group. “Nothing is being left off the table. We have to do something.”

Immigration protest at Texas Capitol. February 22nd, 2011
Immigration protest at Texas Capitol. February 22nd, 2011

Jury Still Out on Local Immigration Enforcement

Wednesday’s court ruling that the city of Farmers Branch does not have the authority to enact immigration legislation is being hailed as a major victory for immigrants in Texas. But attorneys caution that the decision hardly means all state and local ordinances are dead on arrival. 

The bridge across the Rio Grande that connects Eagle Pass, Texas, to Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico, Saturday, February 4, 2012.
The bridge across the Rio Grande that connects Eagle Pass, Texas, to Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico, Saturday, February 4, 2012.

Opponents in Border County Aim to Stop Coal Rail Plan

In the midst of an effort to stop a coal company that plans to mine land in Eagle Pass, a group of Maverick County residents is also looking to stop a planned rail line that would transport the coal to Mexico. But the company says the rail line is a solution to current congestion problems.

Dr. Javier Saenz with a patient, Elena Chavez, 73. Chavez is part of the 50 percent of patients Saenz sees who draw from both Medicare and Medicaid.
Dr. Javier Saenz with a patient, Elena Chavez, 73. Chavez is part of the 50 percent of patients Saenz sees who draw from both Medicare and Medicaid.

State Cuts Squeezing Elderly Poor and Their Doctors

After the state reduced its share of co-payments for Texans who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, doctors who treat such patients are seeing revenue disruptions. The new rules are poised to save the state $475 million. But the doctors treating dual-eligible patients worry whether the changes will put them out of business.