Tribpedia: Texas Education Agency

Tribpedia

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) oversees primary and secondary public education for the state, including setting accountability standards. The Commissioner of Education, Michael L. Williams, manages the TEA, and the agency works in conjunction with the State Board of Education (SBOE) in setting curriculum standards.

According to its website, the TEA:

  • manages the textbook adoption process;
  • oversees development of the ...

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Texas to Apply for No Child Left Behind Waiver

Education Commissioner Michael Williams, a former railroad commissioner, is shown at a TribLive event on Jan. 27, 2011.
Education Commissioner Michael Williams, a former railroad commissioner, is shown at a TribLive event on Jan. 27, 2011.

Texas plans to join the more than 30 states that have already asked for a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind Act's requirements, according to a letter new state Education Commissioner Michael Williams sent school districts Thursday. 

New Marketplace Emerges After Textbook Buying Changes

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A year ago, Texas drastically changed the way it regulates school district purchases of instructional materials. Last week, the Texas Association of School Boards opened up a new marketplace with more than 100,000 options for districts to choose from, but some are still wary of making purchases.

Texas Schools Foot Big Bill for STAAR Retakes

The school year ended the first week of June for most Texas students, but for many of them, it won’t mean the end of class. A new state requirement that students must retake standardized tests if they do not achieve a minimum score has landed hundreds of thousands in summer school, carrying a hefty price tag for school districts.

Early STAAR Results Are as Expected, TEA Says

The Texas Education Agency released initial results from the rigorous new State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness. Just over half of students in ninth grade met the new passing standards for writing, while 87 percent passed biology. Some have worried the new tests will be too rigorous.

05/07/2012 Tribweek
05/07/2012 Tribweek

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 5/7/12

E. Smith interviews Dan Patrick about John Carona, Root on the race to replace Ron Paul, Batheja on a nest of open House seats in Tarrant County, Aguilar on a border brawl over a congressional seat in El Paso, Tan on the fight over Planned Parenthood in West Texas, Aaronson maps the holes in the state's health care provider network, M. Smith on who might be the next Texas education commissioner, Ramshaw on social media sabotage, Hamilton and Ramshaw on the reaction to news of job insecurity for UT-Austin's president and Grissom on a knickers-twisting historical marker: The best of our best content from May 7 to 11, 2012.

Interactive: Texas Budget Cuts Shrink State Government

With the state government tightening its belt, there are now 10,200 fewer state employees, according to an analysis of data collected by the state auditor’s office. This interactive shows how budget cuts have affected employment at state-funded entities from the second quarter of fiscal year 2011 to the second quarter of fiscal 2012.

Texas Commissioner of Education Robert Scott answers questions at TASA midwinter conference in Austin, Texas February 1st, 2011
Texas Commissioner of Education Robert Scott answers questions at TASA midwinter conference in Austin, Texas February 1st, 2011

Who Will Fill The Texas Education Agency's Top Spot?

Education Commissioner Robert Scott's successor will have his or her hands full. The job requires a delicate balancing act in regard to state lawmakers and school administrators across the state. Plus, the budget picture isn't looking any brighter. So who could get Gov. Rick Perry's nod for the post?

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 4/30/12

Aguilar on the House District 77 primary, Batheja on the HD-101 and SD-9 primaries, Galbraith on the GOP candidates for two Railroad Commission slots, Grissom on the latest in the Kerry Max Cook case, Hamilton on Texas A&M's new accountability website, Murphy and M. Smith on how much superintendents make, Ramsey interviews a would-be Democratic Party chair, Root on that nice Ted Nugent, M. Smith on the resignation of the state's education commissioner and Tan on the continuing court fight over Planned Parenthood: The best of our best content from April 30 to May 4, 2012.

The Weekly TribCast: Episode 130

On this week's podcast, Ross, Emily, Morgan and Ben weigh the recent resignation of Texas Education Commissioner Robert Scott and the back and forth court rulings on Planned Parenthood and the Women's Health Program. Our reporting quartet also looks ahead to this weekend's Tea Party rally in Austin, an event headlined by Ron and Rand Paul. 

Texas Commissioner of Education Robert Scott speaks at the TASA midwinter conference in Austin, Texas February 1st, 2011
Texas Commissioner of Education Robert Scott speaks at the TASA midwinter conference in Austin, Texas February 1st, 2011

Texas Education Commissioner Robert Scott Stepping Down

Texas Education Agency Commissioner Robert Scott is leaving the post Gov. Rick Perry appointed him to in 2007. Under Scott's tenure, Texas was often at the center of national conversations on education, skirmishing with the Obama administration over Race to the Top and making deep reductions to public education funding. More recently, Scott drew fire over his remarks suggesting Texas needed to reform how it uses standardized testing.

Interactive: 25,000 Fewer Public School Employees

The release of the 2011-12 school district employment figures shows that public schools in Texas employ about 25,000 fewer employees than they did at this time last year — a 3.8 percent decrease that includes cuts to teachers, administrators and other staff. Use our interactive to see who got the ax in your school district.

The Weekly TribCast: Episode 118

Redistricting remains a hot topic in Texas, and it probably will be until we have new maps and a primary date. But on this week's TribCast, Ben, Ross, Emily and Morgan also spend time on a couple of firestorms in the state: public school accountability testing and the controversy involving Susan G. Komen for the Cure and Planned Parenthood.

Eagle Scout and high school graduate Will Clarkston, 20, logged in to The Bridge School from his bedroom in Houston on Tuesday, October 4, 2011. He is taking online classes now and planning to attend community college in the spring.
Eagle Scout and high school graduate Will Clarkston, 20, logged in to The Bridge School from his bedroom in Houston on Tuesday, October 4, 2011. He is taking online classes now and planning to attend community college in the spring.

Online Classes Booming, But With Red Flags

As the popularity of virtual learning grows, public schools grapple with how to effectively integrate it into their classrooms. Yes, it allows advanced students to take more challenging courses. Yes, it provides crucial help outside of the school walls for students who are struggling. But some worry about the increasing influence of for-profit companies on curriculum and staffing.

Public & Higher Education at The Texas Tribune Festival

We'll be liveblogging throughout the weekend from The Texas Tribune Festival's public and higher education track — which includes panels on the role research should play at state universities, how to pay for public education, why teacher accountability matters and what's next for the controversial State Board of Education.

Texas Commissioner of Education Robert Scott speaks at the TASA midwinter conference in Austin, Texas February 1st, 2011
Texas Commissioner of Education Robert Scott speaks at the TASA midwinter conference in Austin, Texas February 1st, 2011

Texas Still Undecided on No Child Left Behind Waiver

Despite more details from the Obama administration today about how it would exempt states from complying with the law's signature requirements, the Texas Education Agency has yet to decide whether it will apply for a waiver on federal accountability requirements under the 2001 act.

Dr. Susan Tortolero (right) and Pastor Ed Ainsworth (left)
Dr. Susan Tortolero (right) and Pastor Ed Ainsworth (left)

More Texas Schools Teach Safe Sex With Abstinence

Abstinence still rules on a policy level, but local communities are realizing that something isn't working in the state with the third-highest teen birth rate. So a quiet message is spreading through Texas schools: It's time to start teaching students about contraception.