Tribpedia: Texas Democratic Party

Tribpedia

The Texas Democratic Party is the state branch of the Democratic party, generally considered to be center-left on the political spectrum.  It is one of the two major political parties in Texas, the other being the Republican Party of Texas.

The TDP raises money, organizes events, and campaigns for state Democratic candidates.

After many decades in the majority, Democrats have ...

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Video: Texas Democratic Delegates Aim to Turn the Tide

At the Democratic National Convention, Texas Democratic delegates see reasons for hope in making gains in their home state, and they say enthusiasm hasn't waned for President Obama. Some delegates say they also want to hear reinvigorated messages of hope, looking for that "spark to relight the fire."

The Tribune is collaborating with YNN/Capital Tonight to provide convention coverage. 

Video: Texas Democratic Chief Says Latino Vote is Key

At the Democratic National Convention, Texas Democratic Party Chairman Gilberto Hinojosa says the Latino population is the potential "game-changer" in Democrats' quest to turn Texas blue. 

Hinojosa also said that the selection of San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro as the convention's keynote speaker is a recognition of his leadership and shows the importance of the Latino population to the party.


The Tribune is collaborating with YNN/Capital Tonight to provide convention coverage. 

Watching the Election From the Cheap Seats

Texas hasn't been a swing state in a national election for a long, long time, and unless they have big bank accounts, Texans aren't at the top of candidates' lists of people to see right now. The focus at the political conventions and in the weeks leading up to the election is on the states where the outcomes are uncertain.

Yarbrough Pushes for Amnesty in Latest Ad

Retired educator Grady Yarbrough, one of the two Democrats in a primary runoff to replace U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison is airing a new television ad focused on immigration.

In the second television ad of his campaign, Yarbrough advocates for passing the DREAM Act, sealing the border "by whatever means necessary" and granting citizenship to all illegal immigrant workers who have been in the country at least seven years and have no criminal history.

Yarbrough said he has personally visited television stations around the state in recent weeks in order to purchase time for the ad to air. He has also produced a Spanish version of the ad.

"I’m going into pretty much all the major markets in the state and spending thousands of dollars in each of those markets," Yarbrough said. "I’ve probably spent $25,000 to $30,000."

This is Yarbrough's second television ad of his campaign. The first one aired just once in Waco before the primary, he said.

Yarbrough's campaign spending has become an issue in his runoff against former state Rep. Paul Sadler. Yarbrough, who says he is spending only his own money, had not filed a single campaign finance report when he came in second in the May 29 primary. Since then, Yarbrough has filed reports, though he has not spelled out where he is spending his money. The Federal Election Commission has sent him two letters asking for more information.

Sadler said Yarbrough's immigration stance is not in line with the state's Democrats and is turning off voters. He pointed to Yarbrough's reference to building a "Berlin Wall" at the U.S. southern border in last month's televised debate.

An Election Sprint-Turned-Slog Comes to an End

A long and grinding political primary season is finally coming to an end Tuesday. Redistricting drastically altered the primary schedule, so a runoff that was originally scheduled for May is taking place two months later. The delay provided momentum to some candidates while taking it away from others.

David Dewhurst makes a final statement during his speech to the Texas Republican Convention on June 9, 2012.
David Dewhurst makes a final statement during his speech to the Texas Republican Convention on June 9, 2012.

Two Different Parties, Two Very Different Moods

Texas Democrats are looking for a place at the table, but they don't have much weight to throw around these days. Texas Republicans control the table, but they are trying to stop the food fights as different factions debate over who is holding truest to the conservative mission. Running a political party isn't easy.

Texas Democrats elected their first Hispanic party chairman, Gilberto Hinojosa, on June 9, 2012.
Texas Democrats elected their first Hispanic party chairman, Gilberto Hinojosa, on June 9, 2012.

Texas Democrats Elect Their First Hispanic Chairman

Texas Democrats made Gilberto Hinojosa their first Hispanic chairman Saturday, closing a convention peppered with questions about the viability of the party that once dominated the state's politics. Hinojosa has said he'll appeal to the party's base — like, he said, the Republicans do — to energize voters and bring the Democrats back.

Why State Conventions, Besides the Funny Hats?

Conventions might not be absolutely necessary to conduct the state's political business, but they're important to the partisans who, just like other kinds of enthusiasts, find strength in numbers. The Democrats and Republicans meeting in Houston and Fort Worth are getting a few days with thousands of people just like them.

Gov. Rick Perry, closing his speech to the first general session of the Texas Republican Convention.
Gov. Rick Perry, closing his speech to the first general session of the Texas Republican Convention.

State Parties Will All Convene This Weekend

Political parties are getting down to the business of state conventions. In Texas, the four top parties will convene, in different cities, this weekend. Ben Philpott reports for KUT News and The Texas Tribune.