Tribpedia: Tea Party

Tribpedia

The Tea Party is a conservative movement made up of loosely affiliated groups unified around the central principles of limited government and fiscal responsibility.  While most of the various groups that compose the movement agree on the Tea Party principles — limited government, fiscal responsibility, personal responsibility, the rule of law and national sovereignty — they often disagree on individual tenets ...

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Houston-Area Tea Party Leader Had Ties to Fascist Party

As recently as 2003, the president of the Greater Fort Bend County Tea Party had a very different title: director of propaganda for the American Fascist Party. James Ives says he was merely curious about the group, and that he went undercover to do research for a novel. But the messages he posted on a fascist listserv and a promotional video his image appears in have the state's conservative leaders concerned. 

Kevin Eltife, a Republican state senator from Tyler, has served District 1 since 2004.
Kevin Eltife, a Republican state senator from Tyler, has served District 1 since 2004.

GOP Senator Eltife Challenging His Party on Debt, Taxes

State Sen. Kevin Eltife, R-Tyler, is engaged in a long-term campaign to convince his fellow legislators that the state's bond debt is an urgent problem and that tax increases are part of a conservative solution. “If we don’t get our act together and start solving problems, this will be a Democratic state,” Eltife said. 

Michael Quinn Sullivan: "Our Side is Winning"

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Michael Quinn Sullivan has become one of the most powerful unelected figures at the Capitol, happily doing battle with lawmakers he says are wasting taxpayers’ money. But in his never-ending crusade to fight spending, he has trained his sights on an unlikely foe: the members of his own party. An exclusive excerpt from Nate Blakeslee's profile of Sullivan in the January 2013 issue of Texas Monthly.

Awards stand of the Formula One Grand Prix in Austin, left to right, Comptroller Susan Combs, Nick Craw of FIA, Governor Rick Perry and Lt. Governor David Dewhurst.
Awards stand of the Formula One Grand Prix in Austin, left to right, Comptroller Susan Combs, Nick Craw of FIA, Governor Rick Perry and Lt. Governor David Dewhurst.

F1 Race Over, but Debate on Tax Subsidies Continues

The Formula One drivers have come and gone, and the helicopters that ferried well-heeled businessmen to the new race track near Austin have fallen silent. But the task of providing as much as $250 million in tax subsidies to the race promoters is just getting started.

Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst on Jan. 27, 2009, before Perry's State of the State address.
Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst on Jan. 27, 2009, before Perry's State of the State address.

Risks For Perry In Senate Race

Texas Weekly

Rick Perry, re-building his brand after a calamitious presidential campaign, is running some risk in the U.S. Senate race, where Tea Party darling Ted Cruz is stirring anti-establishment anger and where the governor has endorsed David Dewhurst.

The Weekly TribCast: Episode 130

On this week's podcast, Ross, Emily, Morgan and Ben weigh the recent resignation of Texas Education Commissioner Robert Scott and the back and forth court rulings on Planned Parenthood and the Women's Health Program. Our reporting quartet also looks ahead to this weekend's Tea Party rally in Austin, an event headlined by Ron and Rand Paul. 

Texas Gov. Rick Perry addresses a crowd estimated at 1,000 at a tax day "tea party" April 15 at City Hall to protest federal government stimulus programs
Texas Gov. Rick Perry addresses a crowd estimated at 1,000 at a tax day "tea party" April 15 at City Hall to protest federal government stimulus programs

Three Years After Tea Party Rallies, Perry Presses On

Three years ago, Gov. Rick Perry got his first real look at the Tea Party movement when he made multiple Tax Day speeches. He says many candidates running for office now and many elected in the Republican landslide in 2010 were either influenced, inspired or recruited by the Tea Party. He is aiming to ensure that they pledge to toe the line.

Weekend Insider: El Paso War, Perry's Tea Party

Since 2006, thousands have been killed in the drug war in Chihuahua, Mexico. Many displaced by the violence are seeking refuge in El Paso, they have come together to form a nonprofit group called Mexicans in Exile. They plan to tour Texas to raise awareness about the tragedy in their homeland. Julian Aguilar explains why the group says they are not "illegal" or "undocumented" but refugees in a place where they never wanted to live.

Ross Ramsey examines how the Tea Party movement has influenced Gov. Rick Perry over the past three years. From the governor's book to his 2010 re-election campaign and his bid for the GOP presidential nomination.  

Find these stories and more in this weekend's editions of the The New York Times and at texastribune.org.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 3/26/11

Aaronson interactively maps Texas Medicaid providers, Aguilar talks legalization with the head of the Drug Policy Alliance, Galbraith on farmers watering what they know won't grow, Grisson sits down with exoneree Michael Morton, Hamilton on the elusive $10,000 college degree, Murphy et al. update the 2012 election brackets, Ramsey on Bill Ratliff's frank budget analysis, Ramshaw on a hospital where the overweight need not apply, Root on Joe Straus' primary opponent and Tan rounds up reactions to the Supreme Court's health care hearings: The best of our best content from March 26-30, 2012.

Group Aims to Bring God Into Politics

God and Country, a new Texas-based organization, will hold a rally Saturday at a Tyler church to “draw a line in the sand and aggressively and publicly defend those certain unalienable rights endowed by our creator.”

Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.

The Morning After: Perry Returns from the Trail

Texas Weekly

When the Legislature decamped from Austin in July, there was a sense of order in Texas politics. And yet, as Rick Perry returns a mere seven months later, conditions on the ground in Texas border on the chaotic.

Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.

Rick Perry Returns to Texas, and to Texas Politics

The underlying fundamentals that buttressed Gov. Rick Perry's political power in the state are not much changed, and they suggest that he will reassert his powerful presence in Texas politics now that he is back. His relationship with voters may be in a rut, but when it comes to the legislators, business interests and interest groups who practice politics every day, he still holds sway.

Rick Perry at greenhouse at Pioneer, an agricultural company in Johnston, Iowa. At his left is Lane Arthur, VP for information management. Thursday, Nov. 3.
Rick Perry at greenhouse at Pioneer, an agricultural company in Johnston, Iowa. At his left is Lane Arthur, VP for information management. Thursday, Nov. 3.

Perry, Channeling 2010, Sharpens Anti-Washington Talk

It’s not enough to say Washington has gone too far with job-killing regulations and reckless spending. Rick Perry now says he wants to destroy the nation’s capital as we know it. Perry will take his rhetorical "sledgehammer" to downtown Des Moines tonight, along with several other GOP hopefuls trying to put first-test Iowa in the win column.